System Bits: Sept. 3


Microprocessor built with carbon nanotubes Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were able to design a microprocessor with carbon nanotubes and fabricate the chip with traditional processes, an advance that could be used in next-generation computers. Work on producing carbon nanotube field-effect transistors has gone on for some time. Fabricated at scale, those CNFETs oft... » read more

System Bits: July 10


Light waves run on silicon-based chips Researchers at the University of Sydney’s Nano Institute and Singapore University of Technology and Design collaborated on manipulating light waves on silicon-based microchips to keep coherent data as it travels thousands of miles on fiber-optic cables. Such waves—whether a tsunami or a photonic packet of information—are known as solitons. The... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 3


Gamma-ray inspection The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has started a program to develop gamma-ray inspection techniques. The effort, called the Gamma Ray Inspection Technology (GRIT) program, is aimed to develop gamma-ray radiation sources in compact form factors for use in national security, industrial, and medical applications. [caption id="attachment_24151285" alig... » read more

System Bits: Feb. 11


Modeling computer vision on human vision University of Michigan scientists used digital foveation technology to render images that are more comprehensible to machine vision systems, while also reducing energy consumption by 80%. The effect is achieved by manipulating a camera’s firmware. “It'll make new things and things that were infeasible before, practical,” Professor Robert Dick s... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 8


Improving robot vision, virtual reality, self-driving cars In order to generate information-rich images and video frames that will enable robots to better navigate the world and understand certain aspects of their environment, such as object distance and surface texture, engineers at Stanford University and the University of California San Diego have developed a camera that generates 4D images... » read more

System Bits: July 25


The language of glove In a development that allows the gestures in American Sign Language to be decoded, University of California San Diego researchers have developed a smart glove that also has application in virtual and augmented reality to telesurgery, technical training and defense. [caption id="attachment_232228" align="alignnone" width="300"] "The Language of Glove": a smart glove that ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 8


Self-healing magnetic ink The University of California at San Diego has developed a self-healing magnetic ink. The ink can be used to print inexpensive electrochemical devices, such as batteries, sensors, textile-based electrical circuits and other products. A key to the technology is the self-healing concept. This means a device could autonomously repair itself in the field. Over the ye... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 6


3D nanoshaping A team of researchers led by Purdue University report they’ve developed a method for creating large-area patterns of 3D nanoshapes from metal sheets. They believe this represents a potential manufacturing system to inexpensively mass produce innovations such as "plasmonic metamaterials" for advanced technologies, and could enable high-speed electronics, advanced sensors and so... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 13


Crawling And Climbing Robots The field of autonomous robotics is generating interest, as these systems can explore areas and perform functions that are risky and inaccessible to humans. The University of California at San Diego and EPFL separately have developed new autonomous robots for a range of applications. For example, UC San Diego has developed a robot designed to scoot along utility... » read more

System Bits: July 9


New quantum computing algorithm Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have proposed a new algorithm for quantum computing that they believe will speed a particular type of problem…but swifter calculations would come at the cost of greater physical resources devoted to precise timekeeping. The algorithm would be used to conduct a task called an unstructured search. The go... » read more