Manufacturing Bits: May 21


World’s loudest underwater sound A group of researchers hit tiny jets of water with a high-power X-ray laser, creating a record for the world’s loudest underwater sound. The intensity of the blast resulted in an underwater sound with an intensity greater than 270 decibels (dB). That’s greater than the intensity of a rocket launch or equivalent of creating electrical power for a city o... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 14


Radiation thermometers The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a thermometer that can measure radiation within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius. The so-called Ambient-Radiation Thermometer (ART) from NIST is a new type of radiation thermometer, which measures infrared radiation (IR) given off by objects without touching them. Measuring 60 centimeters ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 6


Ionic memory Sandia National Laboratories, Stanford University and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst have developed an ionic floating-gate memory array (IFG) for neuromorphic computing. For some time, the industry has been working on neuromorphic computing. The goal of neuromorphic computing is to replicate the brain in silicon. In a neuromorphic chip, the goal is to mimic the way ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 30


Single-atom catalysts A group of researchers have captured the behavior of a single-atom catalyst, a move that could one day help design more efficient catalysts in systems. A catalyst is a substance that increases the rate of a chemical reaction. In vehicles, for example, platinum is used as a catalyst, which speeds up chemical reactions and cleans exhaust gases. Besides platinum, the indu... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 23


Sorting nuclei CERN and GSI Darmstadt have begun testing the first of two giant magnets that will serve as part of one of the largest and most complex accelerator facilities in the world. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, recently obtained two magnets from GSI. The two magnets weigh a total of 27 tons. About 60 more magnets will follow over the next five years. These ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 16


Water that won’t freeze ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have developed water that doesn’t freeze at cold temperatures. Using various molecules with water, researchers have been able to cool the substance down to minus 263 degrees Celsius. Even then, there were no ice crystals formed in the substance. This technology could be used to develop new biomolecules and membranes for ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 8


Designing metamaterials Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse-design software technology that automates the design of optical metamaterials. Metamaterials are artificial materials containing arrays of metal nanostructures or mega-atoms. Some metamaterials are able to bend light around objects, rendering them invisible. But they only interact with light over a very narrow ran... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 2


Bright particle accelerators The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) has reached a major milestone in the world’s most luminous or brightest particle accelerator. KEK has recently made the first physics run in the SuperKEKB, a storage ring that combines an electron-positron collider with a new and advanced detector. Electron-positron collisions have restarted at the SuperK... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 26


ALD materials database Atomic Limits, a blog site that addresses atomic-level processing technologies, has developed an online database listing all atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials and processes. The database could be useful for ALD processes in semiconductors and other fields. ALD is a deposition technique that deposits materials one layer at a time. In ALD systems, wafers are place... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 19


Exascale computers Intel and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have set plans to develop and deliver the first exascale supercomputer in the United States. The system, called Aurora, will provide an exaFLOP of performance or a quintillion floating point computations per second. Targeted for delivery in 2021, the system is being developed at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory. The system ... » read more

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