Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 20


Predicting crystal structures A group of researchers have improved a crystal structure prediction algorithm, enabling the ability to develop new crystal structures and compounds at faster rates. In 2005, Artem Oganov, now a professor at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), developed a crystal structure predic... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 13


Quantum memories The University of Alberta has developed a new method for making quantum memories, paving the way for a next-generation quantum Internet. Quantum memory is targeted for quantum networks and computers. In classical computing, the information is stored in bits, which can be either a “0” or “1”. In quantum computing, information is stored in quantum bits, or qubits, whi... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 6


FISH metrology The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Mayo Clinic have developed a new molecular probe for use in imaging cells in living organisms. The probe combines conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) metrology techniques with compact quantum dots. This technology can measure and count ribonucleic acid (RNA) in cells and tissue without organic dyes. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 30


World’s smallest gyroscope The California Institute of Technology has developed the world's smallest optical gyroscope. The gyroscope is 500 times smaller than current devices, but it can detect phase shifts that are 30 times smaller than today’s systems. [caption id="attachment_24139584" align="alignleft" width="300"] The new optical gyroscope—shown here with grains of rice—is 5... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 23


3D stacked finFETs At the upcoming 2018 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), Imec is expected to present a paper on a 3D stacked finFET architecture. IEDM is slated from Dec. 1-5 in San Francisco. Imec’s technology is based what on the R&D organization calls sequential integration. Another R&D organization, Leti, calls it 3D monolithic integration. Regardless, the idea... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 16


World’s fastest camera The Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) in Canada has developed what researchers say is the world’s fastest camera. The camera, called T-CUP, is capable of capturing ten trillion frames per second. It’s possible to nearly freeze time to see various phenomena in the system. In a system, the technology can be used to take high-speed images of sam... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 9


Super atoms The Technical University of Munich (TUM) has devised what it calls a super atom, a technology that could one day enable a new class of catalysts. TUM developed a cluster made up of 55 copper and aluminum atoms. The cluster looks like a crystal, but it actually has the properties of an atom or a heterometallic super atom. The super atom could one day be used to develop more cost-... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 2


Quantum satellites The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering has developed a critical technology to enable quantum satellites. Fraunhofer has developed a quantum source, which would be used in satellites. In theory, the source generates entangled photons and transmits them to Earth from a satellite. They would serve to distribute secure keys for encrypting data. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 25


Simulating quarks and gluons The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory is simulating sub-atomic particles on the world’s most powerful supercomputer. The system is simulating these particles at speeds over 70 times faster than the predecessor. More specifically, Oak Ridge is simulating quarks and gluons on the recently-announced Summit supercomputer. In simple terms,... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 18


Flexible nanowires The University of Glasgow has developed a new contact-printing system that prints and embeds silicon nanowires into flexible surfaces. The technology enables new forms of flexible electronics. It can be used to develop low-power circuits in flexible substrates, such as plastic, paper and fabrics. Researchers from the University of Glasgow have developed a new contact-p... » read more

← Older posts