Manufacturing Bits: March 19


Exascale computers Intel and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have set plans to develop and deliver the first exascale supercomputer in the United States. The system, called Aurora, will provide an exaFLOP of performance or a quintillion floating point computations per second. Targeted for delivery in 2021, the system is being developed at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory. The system ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 11


Measuring molecules The Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a new metrology technique that determines the properties of individual molecules. The technique, called single-molecule excitation–emission spectroscopy, improves upon the traditional methods to explore molecules. The traditional method, dubbed single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS), is not new and is used to analyze f... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 5


WAAM process Thales Alenia Space, Cranfield University and Glenalmond Technologies have produced a prototype of a titanium pressure vessel for use in future space missions. The vessel is 1 meter in height and weighs 8.5kg. The titanium alloy is made using Cranfield’s additive technology, dubbed the Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) process. Related to 3D printing technology, WA... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 26


Vitamin C chips Using vitamin C, Rice University has developed a process that turns gold nanorods into small gold nanowires. Nanorods are a type of structure, while nanowires are simply tiny wires. With the technology, Rice is able to produce nanowires with various lengths. These can be used in electronics as well as light-manipulating applications like plasmons. A “plasmon is a quantum o... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 19


Computed Axial Lithography Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California at Berkeley have developed a 3D printing method to produce a new class of polymer parts. The technology, called Computed Axial Lithography (CAL), projects photons on a resin in a vial within a 3D printer. In total, researchers have demonstrated the ability to shine 1,440 different proje... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 11


How things stick together Using a metrology technique called atomic force microscopy (AFM), Brown University has gained more insights into the theory of adhesion or how things stick together. Understanding the theory of adhesion also has some practical applications. It could pave the way towards a new class of MEMS or nanoscale devices. Nanoscale patterning is another potential application.... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 5


Multi-beam litho shakeout The multi-beam e-beam market for lithography applications continues to undergo a shakeout amid technical roadblocks and other issues. Last week, ASML announced that it had acquired the intellectual-property (IP) assets of Mapper Lithography, a Dutch supplier of multi-beam e-beam tools for lithography applications that fell into bankruptcy late last year. As it t... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 29


Thermal lithography Using a technique called thermal scanning probe lithography, New York University (NYU) and others have reported a breakthrough in fabricating 2D semiconductors. With the technology, researchers have devised metal electrodes with vanishing Schottky barriers on 2D semiconductors based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂). Thermal scanning probe lithography, sometimes called t-... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 22


Open-source CVD Boise State University has developed an inexpensive chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system to enable the growth of two-dimensional (2D) materials. Using open-source designs and off-the-shelf components, researchers have developed an automated CVD system for $30,000 in hardware costs, according to Boise State in the journal PLoS One. 2D materials could enable a new class ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 14


Tracking cell movement Using a technology called cyro-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) have gained a better understanding of how cells move in living organisms. Cells, the basic building blocks of living things, need to move. Moving cells help enable embryonic develop... » read more

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