Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 18


Flexible nanowires The University of Glasgow has developed a new contact-printing system that prints and embeds silicon nanowires into flexible surfaces. The technology enables new forms of flexible electronics. It can be used to develop low-power circuits in flexible substrates, such as plastic, paper and fabrics. Researchers from the University of Glasgow have developed a new contact-p... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 11


Microscopy resolution record Cornell University says that it has achieved a world’s record for the highest resolution microscope. Using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and a new detector, Cornell has demonstrated features of atoms in a two-dimensional semiconductor sheet as small as 0.39 angstroms. In comparison, atoms are about 2 to 4 angstroms in diameter. An angstrom... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 4


Flat diamond chips Kanazawa University and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) have developed a process that solves a big issue for diamond semiconductors in power applications. Researchers have developed a water vapor annealing technique that creates atomically flat diamond surfaces. This brings diamond semiconductors one step closer to becoming more... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 28


Neutron scattering The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has reached what the agency says is the world’s highest power level for a neutron source. Oak Ridge has several facilities, including the so-called Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS is used in a metrology field called neutron scattering. Used in physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science, neutron ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 21


World’s smallest transistor The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has developed what researchers say is the world’s smallest transistor. Researchers have devised a single-atom transistor. The transistor switches an electrical current via a single atom, which resides in a gel electrolyte. The device also works at room temperature. While others have developed single-atom transist... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 14


Strange metals The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (National MagLab) has unraveled the behavior in a new class of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials called cuprates. Cuprates are sometimes referred as a "strange" or "bad" metal. They don't conduct electricity well despite being a superconducting material. Superconductors are devices that have zero electrical resistance,... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 7


DNA ROMs The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Semiconductor Research Corp. (SRC) are investing $12 million to develop a new class of memories and other technologies, such as DNA-based read-only memory (ROM), nucleic acid memory (NAM) and neural networks based on yeast cells. The effort is called the Semiconductor Synthetic Biology for Information Processing and Storage Technologies... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 31


Florida R&D fab A new microelectronics R&D initiative in Florida is expanding its operations and readying its new 200mm fab facility. The initiative, called BRIDG, describes itself as a non-profit, public-private partnership. BRIDG is basically an R&D microelectronics facility, which is focusing on the development of select technologies, such as photonics, sensors, imagers and 2.5D/3D pac... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 24


Fast rotors Purdue University and others have developed what researchers claim is the world’s fastest man-made rotor. Researchers devised a tiny dumbbell from silica. Then, the object was levitated in a vacuum using a laser, thereby creating a spinning effect. This, in turn, enabled more than 60 billion revolutions per minute or more than 100,000 times faster than a dental drill. The t... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 16


Levitating metrology The Instituto de Ciencias Físicas UNAM has developed a new contaminant detection technique. It uses sound waves to levitate droplets of water for sampling purposes. Researchers use a technique called laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The technique analyzes heavy metals in levitating drops of water, according to The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Letter... » read more

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