Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Deals ArterisIP inked a deal with Mobileye, which has bought multiple licenses for ArterisIP's interconnect and resilience technology for functional safety and AI hardware acceleration. Mobileye, which was purchased by Intel last year for $15.3 billion, will use the technology for ISO 26262/ASIL B and D SoCs. Siemens agreed to operate its MindSphere digital operating system on Alibaba Cloud... » read more

Getting To The Self-Driving Car


Realizing the vision of the fully autonomous vehicle is one of the most ambitious research and development initiatives since the Apollo program of the Space Age. While the goal of Apollo was to send a man to the Moon and safely return him to Earth, the goal of self-driving cars is to get a person out from behind the steering wheel and safely convey that person to home, work, a vacation resor... » read more

Reconfigurable AI Building Blocks For SoCs And MCUs


FPGA chips are in use in many AI applications today, including Cloud datacenters. Embedded FPGA (eFPGA) is now becoming used for AI applications as well. Our first public customer doing AI with EFLX eFPGA is Harvard University, who will present a paper at Hot Chips August 20th on Edge AI processing using EFLX: "A 16nm SoC with Efficient and Flexible DNN Acceleration for Intelligent IoT Devi... » read more

Security Gap Grows


There is far more talk about security in designs these days, and far more security features being added into chips and systems. So why isn't it making a dent in the number of cyberattacks? According to the Online Trust Alliance, there were 159,700 cyber incidents in 2017 around the globe. But the group notes that because most incidents are not reported, the real number could be twice as lar... » read more

Flexibility A Key For Future Cars


First, a bit of eye candy seen in IC Manage’s booth at the recent Design Automation Conference in San Francisco. The McLaren P1 GTR. It was impossible not to stop and drool over this gorgeous, non-street-legal racecar, where all bets are off when it comes to following safety and reliability specifications. [caption id="attachment_24135661" align="alignleft" width="300"] Source: Dean Dra... » read more

FPGAs Drive Deeper Into Cars


FPGAs are reaching deeper and wider inside of automobiles, playing an increasingly important role across more systems within a vehicle as the electronic content continues to grow. The role of FPGAs in automotive cameras and sensors is already well established. But they also are winning sockets inside of a raft of new technologies, ranging from the AI systems that will become the central logi... » read more

Self-Driving Hits The Safety Reset Button


All of a sudden the autonomous future is looking a bit more uncertain, which is somewhat surprising given what tech and auto boosters have been saying for years now — namely, that self-driving cars are “just around the corner.” (Google that phrase to see just how often they’ve been saying it. Even the starchy Economist trumpets this very meme.) The American Center for Mobility (ACM... » read more

7nm Design Challenges


Ty Garibay, CTO at ArterisIP, talks about the challenges of moving to 7nm, who’s likely to head there, how long it will take to develop chips at that node, and why it will be so expensive. This also raises questions about whether chips will begin to disaggregate at 7nm and 5nm. https://youtu.be/ZqCAbH678GE » read more

Regulations Trail Autonomous Vehicles


Fragmented regulations and unrealistic expectations may be the biggest hurdles for chipmakers selling into the market for self-driving cars during the next few years. Carmakers and the semiconductor industry have made tremendous progress building real-time vision systems and artificial intelligence into relatively traditional automobiles during the past decade or so. But federal and state re... » read more

Still Waiting For Autonomous Vehicles


To better understand the challenges ahead for fully autonomous vehicles, research teams over the last few decades have attempted to automate the process of driving. But early successes have not yet given us truly autonomous vehicles. Why? The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) created the first autonomous vehicle in 1984. This limited-use autonomous vehicle could drive on- and... » read more

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