Are FPGAs More Secure Than Processors?


Security concerns often focus on software being executed on processors. But not all electronic functionality runs in software. FPGAs provide another way to do work, and they can be more secure than functions executed in software. FPGAs provide more control of hardware and are more opaque to attackers. In the case of embedded FPGAs, the designer is in complete control of the entire system. Th... » read more

eFPGAs Vs. FPGA Chiplets


Embedded FPGAs are a totally different concept from discrete FPGA chiplets, and that is reflected in size, cost, power and performance. Geoff Tate, CEO of Flex Logix, talks about which applications are best for each, how each maximizes power and performance, and why choices will vary greatly by application. Related eFPGA Knowledge Center FPGA Knowledge Center Increasing EFPGA Densit... » read more

Integrating FPGA: Comparison Of Chiplets Vs. eFPGA


FPGA is widely popular in systems for its flexibility and adaptability. Increasingly, it is being used in high volume applications. As volumes grow, system designers can consider integration of the FPGA into an SoC to reduce cost, reduce power and/or improve performance. There are two options for integrating FPGA into an SoC: FPGA chiplets, which replace the power hungry SERDES/PHYs wit... » read more

Maximizing Value Post-Moore’s Law


When Moore's Law was in full swing, almost every market segment considered moving to the next available node as a primary way to maximize value. But today, each major market segment is looking at different strategies that are more closely aligned with its individual needs. This diversity will end up causing both pain and opportunities in the supply chain. Chip developers must do more with a ... » read more

Increasing eFPGA Density


How to boost embedded FPGA density to the point where it is competitive with traditional FPGAs, at a lower cost and faster turnaround time. Geoff Tate, CEO of Flex Logix, talks about the importance of interconnects and standard cells in adding flexibility into chips, and why eFPGAs are suddenly gaining attention. » read more

Configuring Processors In The Field


The convergence of two technologies, extensible processors and embedded FPGAs, is enabling the creation of processors that can be dynamically configured in the field. But it's not clear if there is a need for them or how difficult would it be to program them. This remains an open question even though there is evidence of its usefulness in the past and new products are expected to reach the mark... » read more

eFPGA As Fast And Dense As FPGA, On Any Process Node


A challenge for eFPGA when we started Flex Logix is that there are many customers and applications, and they all seemed to want eFPGA on different foundries, different nodes and different array sizes. And everyone wanted the eFPGA to be as fast and as dense as FPGA leaders’ on the same node. Oh, and customers seem to wait to the last minute then need the eFPGA ASAP. Xilinx and Altera (Intel ... » read more

Increasing eFPGA Adoption Will Shape eFPGA Features/Benefits


eFPGA adoption is accelerating. eFPGA is now available from multiple suppliers for multiple foundries and on nodes including 180nm, 40nm, 28nm, 22nm, 16nm, 12nm and 7nm. There are double-digit chips proven in silicon by multiple customers for multiple applications. And many more in fab, in design and in planning. The three main applications are: Integration of existing FPGA chips int... » read more

Chip Design Is Getting Squishy


So many variables, uncertainties and new approaches are in play today across the chip industry today that previous rules are looking rather dated. In the past, a handful of large companies or organizations set the rules for the industry and established an industry roadmap. No such roadmap exists today. And while there are efforts underway to create new roadmaps for different industries, inte... » read more

A New Breed Of Engineer


The industry loves to move in straight lines. Each generation of silicon is more-or-less a linear extrapolation of what came before. There are many reasons for this – products continue to evolve within the industry, adding new or higher performance interfaces, risk levels are lower when the minimum amount is changed for any chip spin, existing software is more likely to run with only minor mo... » read more

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