Using Static Analysis For Functional Safety


Fadi Maamari, group director for R&D at Synopsys, explains why static analysis is suddenly in demand in auto chip design, how it can help to choose the best implementation of functional safety approaches, and where it fits into the design flow. » read more

Using Automotive IP For Easier Integration Of Safety Into SoCs


By Shivakumar Chonnad and Vladimir Litovtchenko Today’s SoCs for automotive safety-related systems integrate numerous IP blocks. At the system level, the Hardware Software Interface (HSI) between these IP blocks needs to be verified in simulation and validated in prototype. However, the scaling of the scope and effort to verify or validate is not linear based on the growing complexity of S... » read more

Scan Diagnosis


Jayant D’Souza, product manager at Mentor, a Siemens Business, explains the difference between scan test and scan diagnosis, what causes values in a scan test to change, how this can be used to hone in on the actual cause of a failure in a design, and how to utilize test hardware more efficiently. » read more

When Is Robustness Verification Complete?


Understandably, hardware designed for an aircraft, or indeed any safety critical application, must be robust. I also believe that all engineers wish to verify their designs as thoroughly as possible, anyway. However, there are limiting factors; most notably the high complexity of most designs. Since we are unable to discover and verify the design against all abnormal conditions, the main questi... » read more

Taking Self-Driving Safety Standards Beyond ISO 26262


I participated in a couple of sessions at Arm TechCon this year, the first on how safety is evolving for platform-based architectures with a mix of safety-aware IP and the second on lessons learned in safety and particularly how the industry and standards are adapting to the larger challenges in self-driving, which obviously extend beyond the pure functional safety intent of ISO 26262. Here I w... » read more

Functional Safety Verification For AV SoC Designs Accelerated With Advanced Tools


Autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be the culmination of dozens of highly complex systems, incorporating state-of-the-art technologies in electronics hardware, sensors, software, and more. Conceiving and designing these systems is certain to be one of the greatest challenges for today’s engineers. The only greater challenge will be convincing a wary public that these automated systems are safer d... » read more

Ensuring Functional Safety For Self-Driving Cars


There may be no hotter topic in electronics than chips for autonomous vehicles. Self-driving cars have captured the public imagination and become a major area of investment. Both established automotive manufacturers and well-funded startups are producing vehicles with the highly complex chips needed to negotiate roads, deal with unpredictable humans and communicate with the cloud for machine le... » read more

Achieving Functional Safety For Autonomous Vehicle SoC Designs


Autonomous vehicle systems will be expected to meet rigorous safety standards regarding many aspects of system design and performance. One set of these standards, known as functional safety, focuses on the safety and reliability of the electrical and electronic systems within the vehicle, and the system-on-chip (SoC) devices in particular. As the complexity of these devices grows, autonomous ve... » read more

OneSpin Users Gather in Munich


Even more than most other high-tech companies, EDA vendors rely on their users for many aspects of their success. Of course, customers provide the revenue that fuels the business, but their influence goes far beyond that. Many features in EDA tools, and even entire categories of products, arise from working closely with advanced users. Even before traditional Beta-testing, selected users provid... » read more

Safety Islands In Safety-Critical Hardware


Safety and security have certain aspects in common so it shouldn’t be surprising that some ideas evolving in one domain find echoes in the other. In hardware design, a significant trend has been to push security-critical functions into a hardware root-of-trust (HRoT) core, following a philosophy of putting all (or most) of those functions in one basket and watching that basket very carefully.... » read more

← Older posts