IBM Takes AI In Different Directions


Jeff Welser, vice president and lab director at IBM Research Almaden, sat down with Semiconductor Engineering to discuss what's changing in artificial intelligence and what challenges still remain. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: What's changing in AI and why? Welser: The most interesting thing in AI right now is that we've moved from narrow AI, where we've proven you... » read more

Speeding Up High-Frequency Trading


The High-Frequency Trading (HFT) industry has received a lot of attention during the last few years. HFT is all about speed and minimizing latency: the faster you can run trading strategies and algorithms for analyzing minute price changes and executing trade orders, the higher the probability to win over competition. So the competition in this area is very fierce with market players continuous... » read more

Challenges At The Edge


By Kevin Fogarty and Ed Sperling Edge computing is inching toward the mainstream as the tech industry begins grappling with the fact that far too much data will be generated by sensors to send everything back to the cloud for processing. The initial idea behind the IoT/IIoT, as well as other connected devices, was that simple sensors would relay raw data to the cloud for processing throug... » read more

AI: The Next Big Thing


The next big thing isn't actually a thing. It's a set of finely tuned statistical models. But developing, optimizing and utilizing those models, which collectively fit under the umbrella of artificial intelligence, will require some of the most advanced semiconductors ever developed. The demand for artificial intelligence is almost ubiquitous. As with all "next big things," it is a horizonta... » read more

Bridging Machine Learning’s Divide


There is a growing divide between those researching [getkc id="305" comment="machine learning"] (ML) in the cloud and those trying to perform inferencing using limited resources and power budgets. Researchers are using the most cost-effective hardware available to them, which happens to be GPUs filled with floating point arithmetic units. But this is an untenable solution for embedded infere... » read more

Machine Learning’s Growing Divide


[getkc id="305" kc_name="Machine learning"] is one of the hottest areas of development, but most of the attention so far has focused on the cloud, algorithms and GPUs. For the semiconductor industry, the real opportunity is in optimizing and packaging solutions into usable forms, such as within the automotive industry or for battery-operated consumer or [getkc id="76" kc_name="IoT"] products. ... » read more

The Future Of AI Is In Materials


I had the pleasure of hosting an eye-opening presentation and Q&A with Dr. Jeff Welser of IBM at a recent Applied Materials technical event in San Francisco. Dr. Welser is Vice President and Director of IBM Research's Almaden lab in San Jose. He made the case that the future of hardware is AI. At Applied Materials we believe that advanced materials engineering holds the keys to unlocking... » read more

Blockchain: Hype, Reality, Opportunities


Blockchain buzz has reached deafening levels, and its proponents say we haven’t heard anything yet. The blockchain-enabled transformations they describe make the Internet revolution look almost trivial. Critics argue that too many people drank the blockchain Kool-Aid. Outside the cryptocurrency arena, they say that blockchain amounts to little more than some really slick slideware. The ... » read more

CAE Turns To HPC


How ANSYS is addressing the value of HPC technology within the CAE market, the main challenges to the use or uptake of HPC resources, and the future for HPC in CAE. The paper also briefly describes ANSYS Discovery Live — a new design tool that takes advantage of thousands of cores available in a GPU to produce instantaneous simulation results with every interactive change to the model. Discov... » read more

Targeting And Tailoring eFPGAs


Robert Blake, president and CEO of Achronix, sat down with Semiconductor Engineering to discuss what's changing in the embedded FPGA world, why new levels of customization are so important, and difficulty levels for implementing embedded programmability. What follows are excerpts of that discussion. SE: There are numerous ways you can go about creating a chip these days, but many of the prot... » read more

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