Manufacturing Bits: May 14


Radiation thermometers The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a thermometer that can measure radiation within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius. The so-called Ambient-Radiation Thermometer (ART) from NIST is a new type of radiation thermometer, which measures infrared radiation (IR) given off by objects without touching them. Measuring 60 centimeters ... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things AT&T reports the activation of its narrowband Internet of Things network in the U.S. The carrier upgraded its 4G LTE cell sites across the country. It now offers two low-power wide-area networks to business customers, including its LTE-M network in Mexico and the U.S. “Both networks are designed for the IoT within licensed spectrum and provide carrier-grade security,â€... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 30


Single-atom catalysts A group of researchers have captured the behavior of a single-atom catalyst, a move that could one day help design more efficient catalysts in systems. A catalyst is a substance that increases the rate of a chemical reaction. In vehicles, for example, platinum is used as a catalyst, which speeds up chemical reactions and cleans exhaust gases. Besides platinum, the indu... » read more

3D NAND Metrology Challenges Growing


3D NAND vendors face several challenges to scale their devices to the next level, but one manufacturing technology stands out as much more difficult at each turn—metrology. Metrology, the art of measuring and characterizing structures, is used to pinpoint problems and ensure yields for all chip types. In the case of 3D NAND, the metrology tools are becoming more expensive at each iteration... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 26


Material holds both electrons, holes Researchers at Ohio State University discovered a material that can hold both electrons and holes. They hope the material, the layered metal crystal NaSn2As2, could simplify electronics, potentially removing the need for multiple layers or materials. "It is this dogma in science, that you have electrons or you have holes, but you don't have both. But our... » read more

System Bits: March 11


Cryptography IC for the IoT Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers report their development of a cryptographic circuit that could be used to protect low-power Internet of Things devices when quantum computing takes hold. [caption id="attachment_24144905" align="alignleft" width="300"] Image Credit: MIT[/caption] The research team presented a paper at the 2019 International Sol... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things McKinsey & Company identified 10 top trends in the Internet of Things. They include: IoT is a business opportunity, not just a tech opportunity; disciplined execution across multiple use cases is the path to value; and IoT is gradually enabling more subscription business models, but consumers are resistant. Louis Columbus of IQMS provides some IoT data points and id... » read more

MEMS & Sensors Technical Congress Focuses on Automotive, Emerging MEMS


This year’s MEMS & Sensors Technical Congress (MSTC), February 19-20, 2019, features a deep dive into the changing automotive sensor landscape, a look at emerging MEMS technologies, and an exploration of integration standards. The more technically focused of SEMI’s annual MEMS events, MSTC returns to Monterey, California, in conjunction with FLEX, the conference that highlights new form... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 22


Efficient neural net training Researchers from the University of California San Diego and Adesto Technologies teamed up to improve neural network training efficiency with new hardware and algorithms that allow computation to be performed in memory. The team used an energy-efficient spiking neural network for implementing unsupervised learning in hardware. Spiking neural networks more closel... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 27


New kilogram definition After years of debate and scientific work, a group of delegates from 60 countries have voted to redefine four key unit measurements—the kilogram, electric current (ampere), temperature (kelvin), and the amount of substance (mole). The vote took place at the recent 26th General Conference of Weights and Measures. Hosted by the International Bureau of Weights and Mea... » read more

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