Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 20


Thermometers for 3D measurements The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is developing a nano-thermometer technology that could one day take 3D temperature measurements at the microscopic scale. The project, called Thermal Magnetic Imaging and Control (Thermal MagIC), hopes to develop tiny thermometers based on magnetic nanoparticles. These tiny thermometers could be injec... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 12


More stable quantum states Researchers at the University of Chicago found a way to make quantum systems retain coherency 10,000 times longer. The fragile nature of quantum states remains a challenge for developing practical applications of quantum computing, as they can be easily disrupted by background noise coming from vibrations, temperature changes or stray electromagnetic fields. Ap... » read more

Security Implications Of Quantum Computing


The US Government just stepped up the push for quantum computing with an award of $625 million in funding to create five quantum information research centers. Industry and academic institutions will contribute $300 million toward this effort with the remainder drawn from the $1.2 billion earmarked in the 2018 law: the National Quantum Initiative Act. The race to quantum computing is a global on... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 4


Advancing rheometry The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a new technology that could advance the field of rheometry. More specifically, NIST has developed a new and advanced capillary rheometer. Rheometry is the study of the flow of liquids, gases or matter in systems. A capillary rheometer is an instrument, which measures the flow properties and shear vis... » read more

Speeding Up The R&D Metrology Process


Several chipmakers are making some major changes in the characterization/metrology lab, adding more fab-like processes in this group to help speed up chip development times. The characterization/metrology lab, which is generally under the radar, is a group that works with the R&D organization and the fab. The characterization lab is involved in the early analytical work for next-generati... » read more

Week In Review: Design, Low Power


Tools & IP Synopsys introduced its DesignWare USB4 IP solution consisting of controllers, routers, PHYs, and verification IP. It supports USB4, DisplayPort with HDCP 2.3 security, PCI Express, and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity protocols through USB Type-C connectors and cables. The USB4 IP operates at up to 40 Gbps, twice the maximum data rate of USB 3.2, and is backwards compatible with USB 3... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 3


Security lithography At the recent SPIE Advanced Lithography conference, Multibeam disclosed more details about its efforts to develop multi-beam direct-write lithography for chip security applications. David Lam, chief executive and chairman of Multibeam, described how multi-beam lithography can be used to help thwart IC counterfeiting and tampering in the market. This lithography technolo... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 28


Fast photography The California Institute of Technology has developed a high-speed camera that can take pictures of transparent objects. The technology, called phase-sensitive compressed ultrafast photography (pCUP), can take up to 1 trillion pictures per second of transparent objects. Potentially, the technology from Caltech could be used in several applications, such as taking photos of s... » read more

How Secure Is Your Face?


Biometric security, which spans everything from iris scans to fingerprint sensors, is undergoing the same kind of race against hackers as every other type of sensor. While most of these systems work well enough to identify a person, there are a number of well-known ways to defeat them. One is simply to apply newer technology to cracking algorithms used inside these devices. Improvements in p... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 5


Nanoliter measurements The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed an optofluidic measurement system that can measure the flow of liquids at the nanoliter scale. Targeted for the field of microfluidics, the system can measure the flow of liquids as small as 10 billionths of a liter per minute. A nanoliter (nL) is one billionth of a liter. A liter is 33.814 ounces... » read more

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