The 3 Main Obstacles To Zero DPPM And How To Overcome Them


As we all well know, there are multiple mission critical applications in today’s “Age of Smart” that are calling for zero DPPM (defective parts per million) in semiconductors and electronic systems. In industries such as automotive, medical, aerospace, and more, where lives are at stake, defective parts are not an option. The quality imperative However, with the ever-growing complexi... » read more

Domain Expertise Becoming Essential For Analytics


Sensors are being added into everything, from end devices to the equipment used to make those sensors, but the data being generated has limited or no value unless it's accompanied by domain expertise. There are two main problems. One is how and where to process the vast amount of data being generated. Chip and system architectures are being revamped to pre-process more of that data closer to... » read more

Module Testing Adds New Challenges


System-in-package (SiP) and other advanced packaging technologies are putting more components together in tighter spaces than previously seen. Often these packages are contained in a module, which is something more than a chip package and a great deal smaller than most printed circuit boards. Testing these modules often requires system-level test. These modules typically will be inserted int... » read more

Who’s Responsible For Transistor Aging Models?


While there are a number of ways to go about reliability and transistor aging analysis, it is all in large part dependent on fabs and foundries to provide the aging models. The situation is also not entirely clear in the semiconductor ecosystem because the classic over-the-wall mentality between design and manufacturing still exists. And unfortunately this wall is bi-directional. Not only... » read more

Listening To The Voice Of Your Product


Much has been said and written about the business values of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Through connecting the manufacturing elements (machines) on the factory floor, and collecting and analyzing their data, manufacturers can significantly improve the efficiency and profitability of their operations through intelligent predictive maintenance of equipment and optimal equipment ut... » read more

Testing IoT Devices


Internet of Things devices present new challenges in testing. Some devices can be tested the same way as standard semiconductors are now tested, but others call for different approaches. Microcontrollers and other chips that go into safety-critical applications — medical devices, military/aerospace systems, and automotive electronics — need their own kind of testing to make sure they wil... » read more

Is Product Quality Getting Lost In The IIoT?


Manufacturing operations have continuously evolved using data capture and management to assess and test production effectiveness on the manufacturing floor. The advent of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and its anticipated ability to track and manage the factory environment with machine-to-machine process analytics heralds yet another transformation, promising a higher level of data in... » read more

2.5D, FO-WLP Issues Come Into Focus


Advanced packaging is beginning to take off after years of hype, spurred by 2.5D implementations in high-performance markets and fan-out wafer-level packaging for a wide array of applications. There are now more players viewing packaging as another frontier driving innovation. But perhaps a more telling sign is that large foundries in Taiwan have begun offering packaging services to customer... » read more

Data Leakage And The IIoT


The Internet of Things has raised concerns about people hacking into home networks or using armies of bots to disrupt communications. But with the Industrial IoT, the stakes are significantly higher—and the effects can last much longer. Security tops the list of concerns as more industrial equipment is connected to the Internet, according to numerous industry insiders. That hasn't stopped ... » read more

Quality Issues Widen


As the amount of semiconductor content in cars, medical and industrial applications increases, so does the concern about how long these devices will function properly—and what exactly that means. Quality is frequently a fuzzy concept. In mobile phones, problems have ranged from bad antenna placement, which resulted in batteries draining too quickly, to features that take too long to load. ... » read more

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