Research Bits: September 26


2D waveguides Researchers from the University of Chicago found that a sheet of glass crystal just a few atoms thick could trap and carry light efficiently up to a centimeter. In tests, the researchers found they could use extremely tiny prisms, lenses, and switches to guide the path of the light along a chip. “We were utterly surprised by how powerful this super-thin crystal is; not on... » read more

Process Innovations Enabling Next-Gen SoCs and Memories


Achieving improvements in performance in advanced SoCs and packages — those used in mobile applications, data centers, and AI — will require complex and potentially costly changes in architectures, materials, and core manufacturing processes. Among the options under consideration are new compute architectures, different materials, including thinner barrier layers and those with higher th... » read more

Research Bits: Nov. 21


Graphene heater for phase-change switches Researchers from the University of Washington, Stanford University, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, University of Maryland, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed an energy-efficient, silicon-based non-volatile switch that manipulates light through the use of a phase-change material and graphene heater. Aiming to reduce the power consum... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 24


Flexible, low power phase-change memory Engineers at Stanford University created a flexible phase-change memory. The non-volatile phase-change memory device is made up of germanium, antimony, and tellurium (GST) between two metal electrodes. 1s and 0s represent measurements of electrical resistance in the GST material. “A typical phase-change memory device can store two states of resis... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 5


Open access superconducting magnets The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory or MagLab has opened the world's strongest superconducting magnet to users. In the works for eight years, the 32 tesla (T) all-superconducting magnet enables scientists to conduct research for various applications, such as quantum matter experiments. The system is called the SCM-32 T. MagLab develops several ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 17


Creating magnets with electricity Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea Institute of Materials Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute, and the University of New South Wales drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then "read" this magneti... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 17


Shrinking perovskites Researchers from Imperial College London, Oxford University, Diamond Light Source, Pohang University of Science and Technology in Korea, and Rutgers University have discovered a material that can be chemically tailored to either expand or contract in a precise way and over a wide temperature range. This could lead to new composite materials that do not expand when heate... » read more