Manufacturing Bits: May 5


Spiking neural network radar chip Imec has developed what the R&D organization says is the world’s first chip that processes radar signals using a spiking recurrent neural network. Initially, the chip from Imec is designed for low-power, anti-collision radar systems in drones. Neural networks are used in the field of machine learning. A subset of AI, machine learning utilizes a neu... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: March 24


Backscatter Wi-Fi radio Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed an ultra-low power Wi-Fi radio they say could enable portable IoT devices. Using 5,000 times less power than standard Wi-Fi radios, the device consumes 28 microwatts while transmitting data at a rate of 2 megabits per second over a range of up to 21 meters. "You can connect your phone, your smart devices, ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 10


Balancing battery capacity and stability Researchers at Rice University are working to develop batteries that are better geared toward electric cars and more robust off-grid energy storage by digging into why lithium gets trapped in batteries, thus limiting the number of times it can be charged and discharged at full power. The team found that by not maxing out a battery's storage capacity,... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Dec. 3


Waking up IoT devices Researchers at UC San Diego developed an ultra-low power wake-up receiver chip that aims to reduce the power consumption of sensors, wearables, and Internet of Things devices that only need to communicate information periodically. "The problem now is that these devices do not know exactly when to synchronize with the network, so they periodically wake up to do this eve... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 19


World’s lightest foam Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed what researchers say is the world’s lightest gold foam. LLNL has devised gold aerogel foam. The foam is light enough where it could be carried on the back of tiny insects. Applications for the technology include electronics, catalysis, sensors and energy conversion and storage. An aerogel is based on a ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 9


World’s strongest silver A group has developed what researchers say is the world’s strongest silver. The silver demonstrated a hardness of 3.05 GPa, which is 42% stronger than the previous world record. The University of Vermont, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, the Ames Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and UCLA contributed to the work. Silver is an element with high electr... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 3


2D straintronics Researchers at the University of Rochester and Xi’an Jiaotong University dug into how 2D materials behave when stretched to push the boundaries of what they can do. "We're opening up a new direction of study," says Stephen Wu, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering and physics at Rochester. "There's a huge number of 2D materials with different properti... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 25


Improving IGBTs Researchers at the University of Tokyo developed a power switching device that surpasses previous performance limits, showing that there may still be gains ahead for the silicon-based devices, which have been thought to be approaching their limits. The team's improved insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) used a scaling approach, and simulations showed that downscaling pa... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 4


Flexible high-temp dielectric Researchers at Rice University, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Cornell University developed a new high-temperature dielectric nanocomposite for flexible electronics, energy storage, and electric devices that combines one-dimensional polymer nanofibers and two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets. The polymer nanofibers act as a structural reinforcement, w... » read more

System Bits: April 16


Characterizing 2D borophene Researchers at Rice and Northwestern universities collaborated on a method to view the polymorphs of 2D borophene crystals, providing insights into the lattice configurations of the two-dimensional material. Boris Yakobson, a materials physicist at Rice’s Brown School of Engineering, and materials scientist Mark Hersam of Northwestern led a team that not only d... » read more

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