Manufacturing Bits: June 26


Gummy bear chips The Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Forschungszentrum Jülich have developed a 3D inkjet printing technique to print electrodes on several soft substrates, including gummy bears. The main application is to develop a new class of sensor-based implants for life sciences. For this application, electrodes or microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are developed and printed on sof... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 22


Exotic water The Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) organization, Uppsala University and SLAC have turned a large X-ray laser into the world’s fastest water heater. Using an X-ray free-electron laser from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have heated water from room temperature to 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond or a millionth of a mil... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 24


Super electron guns The Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is developing a new type of electron gun based on superconducting technology. The new superconducting electron gun recently produced its first beam of electrons, according to SLAC. The technology is being developed for future high-energy X-ray lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. Electron guns a... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 17


Finding metallic glass Using machine learning techniques, a group of researchers have accelerated the discovery of an alloy called metallic glass. Northwestern University, the Department of Energy’s National Accelerator Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised a shortcut for discovering and improving metallic glass. In metallic glass, the at... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 27


Magnesium-ion batteries Texas A&M University and others have discovered a new metal-oxide magnesium battery cathode material—a technology that promises to deliver a higher density of energy storage than today’s traditional lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells. Magnesium-ion battery technology is promising. A battery consists of an anode (negative), cathode (positive), electrolytes and a separat... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 23


Looking inside memristors E-beam inspection is gaining steam. Using this type of technology, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been able to see the inner workings of the memristor. The memristor is a type of ReRAM, which works by changing the resistance of materials. In a memristor, an electric current is applied to a material, changing the resistance of that mat... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 29


Compact synchrotron EUV sources For some time, the industry has been exploring the development of next-generation power sources for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. ASML and Gigaphoton are separately developing EUV sources based on the more traditional and compact laser-produced-plasma (LPP) technology. Then, in R&D, others are exploring the development of futuristic EUV sources us... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 11


China’s storage ring for EUV A group of researchers are banding together to propel the development of a storage ring technology that may one day be used as a power source for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The collaboration includes five institutions. Researchers have organized an informal collaboration or study group with plans to develop a storage ring for EUV based on a techno... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 6


Molecular black holes A group of researchers have used an ultra-bright pulse of X-ray light to hit a tiny atom in a molecule, causing the structure to explode and create a “molecular black hole.” The molecular black hole is different than a black hole in space, however. A black hole is a region in space, which has a gravitational field so strong that no matter or light can escape it. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 30


Looking for heavy photons The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and others have embarked on a mission to find hypothetical particles called heavy photons. In 2015, researchers from the so-called Heavy Photon Search (HPS) group started the experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Researchers installed a particle detector half a millim... » read more

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