Power/Performance Bits: May 19


Neuromorphic magnetic nanowires Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin, University of Texas at Dallas, and Sandia National Laboratory propose a neuromorphic computing method using magnetic components. The team says this approach can cut the energy cost of training neural networks. "Right now, the methods for training your neural networks are very energy-intensive," said Jean Ann... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 11


Light-emitting silicon Researchers from the Eindhoven University of Technology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Johannes Kepler University, and Technische Universität München developed a silicon germanium alloy that can emit light, paving the way for a silicon laser that could be integrated for on-chip and chip-to-chip communication. Bulk silicon is extremely inefficient at emitting... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 27


A ring of 18 carbon atoms Scientists at IBM Research – Zurich and Oxford University write about allotropes of carbon – the many versions of atomic carbon formations, such as diamonds and graphite. “Carbon, one of the most abundant elements in the universe, can exist in different forms - called allotropes - giving it completely different properties from color to shape to hardness. For... » read more

System Bits: May 21


Washable, wearable energy devices for clothing Researchers at the University of Cambridge collaborated with colleagues at China’s Jiangnan University to develop wearable electronic components that could be woven into fabrics for clothing, suitable for energy conversion, flexible circuits, health-care monitoring, and other applications. Graphene and other materials can be directly incorpor... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things Pepper IoT collaborated with the Dark Cubed cybersecurity firm to produce “The State of IoT Security Report,” which can be downloaded here. Pepper IoT is an Internet of Things platform and service provider. Key findings of the report: Device security is important, but the platform is much more critical; patching will not fix systemic problems; and the market must make se... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 4


High precision system for self-driving car navigation Based on technology developed by ETH Zurich researchers, Fixposition is a spin-off specializing in real-time navigation systems for use in self-driving vehicles, robots or industrial drones, which uses a combination of satellite-based positioning systems such as GPS with computer vision technologies to achieve an unparalleled degree of prec... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 27


Hybrid solar for hydrogen and electricity Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed an artificial photosynthesis solar cell capable of both storing the sun's energy as hydrogen through water splitting and outputting electricity directly. The hybrid photoelectrochemical and voltaic (HPEV) cell gets around a limitation of other water splitting devices that shortchange... » read more

System Bits: July 3


Machine learning network for personalized autism therapy MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a personalized deep learning network for therapy use with children with autism spectrum conditions. They reminded these children often have trouble recognizing the emotional states of people around them, such as distinguishing a happy face from a fearful face. To help with this, some therapists... » read more

System Bits: April 24


Some superconductors carry spin currents A few years ago, researchers from the University of Cambridge showed that it was possible to create electron pairs in which the spins are aligned: up-up or down-down. The spin current can be carried by up-up and down-down pairs moving in opposite directions with a net charge current of zero, and the ability to create such a pure spin super-current is an... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 17


Flexible LCDs Researchers at Donghua University and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology developed a flexible, optically rewriteable LCD for paperlike displays. The team estimates it will be cheap to produce, perhaps only costing $5 for a 5-inch screen. Optically rewriteable LCDs, like conventional LCDs, are structured like a sandwich, with a liquid crystal filling between two ... » read more

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