Week In Review: Auto, Security, Pervasive Computing


Automotive/Mobility Apple wants to have self-driving cars in production by 2024, and that timeframe includes having its own battery technology, according to Reuters. Project Titan, the name of Apple’s automotive efforts, has seen its ups and downs, but now Apple has a clearer view of what its strength and niche will be — consumer self-driving cars with a longer range, less expensive batter... » read more

Why It’s So Hard To Stop Cyber Attacks On ICs


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss security risks across multiple market segments with Helena Handschuh, security technologies fellow at Rambus; Mike Borza, principal security technologist for the Solutions Group at Synopsys; Steve Carlson, director of aerospace and defense solutions at Cadence; Alric Althoff, senior hardware security engineer at Tortuga Logic; and Joe Kiniry, princi... » read more

Week In Review: Auto, Security, Pervasive Computing


Automotive Austin, Texas-based automotive startup Uhnder raised $45 million in Series C funding for its digital radar-on-chip. Telechips, a fabless semiconductor company that works on automotive SoCs, is using Arm’s IP to design its Dolphin5 SoC for ADAS (advanced drive assistance systems) and digital cockpits with in-vehicle infotainment (IVI). Dolphin5 will include the Arm’s Mali-G78A... » read more

Automation And Fault Simulation Of Safety-Critical FPGA Designs


Functional safety is a major challenge for field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and other semiconductor designs. Safety requirements go beyond traditional verification, which focuses on design bugs. Chips in safety-critical applications must be able to handle a variety of faults from sources such as temperature and power extremes, device aging, radiation, ionization and component failures. Ap... » read more

Week In Review: Auto, Security, Pervasive Computing


Automotive Self-driving car company Cruise now has driverless cars on the streets of San Francisco, Calif., reports the San Francisco Chronicle. Cruise, which is backed by General Motors, is testing five driverless cars in the urban — and very hilly — environment of San Francisco. Cruise is using an EV — the Chevy Bolt — as a test vehicle. At Level 4 driving, the cars will not have a w... » read more

Tapping Into Purpose-Built Neural Network Models For Even Bigger Efficiency Gains


Neural networks can be categorized as a set of algorithms modelled loosely after the human brain that can ‘learn’ by incorporating new data. Indeed, many benefits can be derived from developing purpose-built “computationally efficient” neural network models. However, to ensure your model is effective, there are several key requirements that need to be considered. One critical conside... » read more

Make Hardware Strong With CWE


What is a weakness? And why should we care? These questions are relevant in probably any field or context you may think of, well beyond engineering or electronics. While in some cases the first-level answers might be obvious, in many others they are not. Generally, weaknesses are considered bad things that can lead to malfunctions, injuries, and other undesirable situations. In many cases, they... » read more

New Security Approaches, New Threats


New and different approaches to security are gaining a foothold as the life expectancy for advanced chips increases, and as emerging technologies such as quantum computing threaten to crack even the most complex encryption schemes. These approaches include everything from homomorphic encryption, where data is processed without being decrypted, to different ways of sending and receiving data ... » read more

IP Safe Enough To Use In Cars


IP that is used for functional safety needs to respond to events that can happen, whether those are planned or random. Jody Defazio, vice president of IP quality and functional safety at Synopsys, talks with Semiconductor Engineering about ASIL compliance, what the different levels mean, and the impact of using chips developed at the most advanced process nodes in automotive applications. » read more

The Cyber-Industrial Revolution


Semiconductors won't save the world, but they certainly will help. In fact, it's arguable whether any significant progress will be made on such issues as global warming or future medical breakthroughs without the aid of ICs. After decades of struggling just to get chips to work at each new process node, the semiconductor industry is moving into a new phase. Processing is now almost ubiquitou... » read more

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