Manufacturing Bits: June 26


Gummy bear chips The Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Forschungszentrum Jülich have developed a 3D inkjet printing technique to print electrodes on several soft substrates, including gummy bears. The main application is to develop a new class of sensor-based implants for life sciences. For this application, electrodes or microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are developed and printed on sof... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 3


World's brightest accelerator Japan’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is readying what is considered the world’s most luminous or brightest particle accelerator. The system, dubbed the SuperKEKB, combines an electron-positron collider with a new and advanced detector. The storage ring system is designed to explore and measure rare decays of elementary particles, such... » read more

Supporting Academic Institutions – A Corporate Responsibility?


Innovation is rooted in collaboration, and there’s no better example—when done correctly—than the partnership between the various academic institutes or between the industry and academia. It’s a symbiotic relationship: Companies get access to leading research, ideas and creativity, while universities and research consortia get access to proven technologies, methodologies and experienced... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 22


Weighing protons The Max Planck Institute and Riken have conducted the world’s most precise measurement of the mass of a proton. Based on an experiment, researchers determined that the mass of a proton is 1.007276466583(15)(29) atomic mass units. This is three times more precise than the previous measurements from others. The numbers in parentheses refer to the statistical and systematic ... » read more

SOS Collaboration Platform: Powering The Next Discoveries In Physics


The world is on the cusp of some of the greatest scientific breakthroughs in human history. The experiments physicists are carrying out today will shed new light on how our universe works. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a $10 billion project, unleashed a new perspective of how our universe works by letting us take a look at how tiny particles interact. You can forgive the physicists workin... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 25


Making strange hadrons CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has produced and observed what it says are the world’s first sub-atomic particles called strange hadrons. Strange hadrons are well-known sub-atomic particles with names such as Kaon, Lambda, Xi and Omega, according to CERN. Strange hadrons have never been observed until now. The observation could shed light on su... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 14


Making quark soup CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, recently presented its latest results on quark-gluon plasma, or quark soup, a state of matter that supposedly existed during the early formation of the universe. For this, CERN used the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC is situated in a tunnel 100 meters underground ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 24


Trapping antimatter Japan’s Riken has conducted measurements in order to discover the differences between matter and antimatter, namely in the complex field of antiprotons. Antimatter is a material composed of antiparticles, according to Wikipedia. Antimatter has the same mass as particles of ordinary matter, but it has an opposite charge, according to Wikipedia. Basically, neutron... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: August 11


World neutrino record The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has achieved a world record for high-energy neutrino experiments. In one neutrino experiment, researchers sustained a 521-kilowatt beam generated by the organization’s so-called Main Injector particle accelerator. The previous record was a 400-plus-kilowatt beam, which was accomplished at CERN. ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 23


Higgs boson sensors At the recent 2014 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in San Francisco, CERN described the tiny hybrid pixel detectors used at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Using CMOS technology, hybrid pixel detectors identify and tag individual sub-atomic particles at fast speeds. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is a particle physics laboratory... » read more

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