Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 4


Advancing rheometry The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a new technology that could advance the field of rheometry. More specifically, NIST has developed a new and advanced capillary rheometer. Rheometry is the study of the flow of liquids, gases or matter in systems. A capillary rheometer is an instrument, which measures the flow properties and shear vis... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 6


Luminosity record Japan’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) has regained the world’s record for the highest luminosity achieved in a particle accelerator, beating the previous mark by CERN. KEK achieved the record in the SuperKEKB, a giant storage ring that combines an electron-positron collider with an advanced detector. This system is designed to explore fundamental ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 6


Powerful electromagnets The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (MagLab) has tested a new and powerful superconducting solenoid or electromagnet that operates at high currents. MagLab develops several different types of large and powerful magnets, which are used as scientific instruments. MagLab’s solenoid or electromagnet could one day be used to drive particle accelerators and compa... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 23


Sorting nuclei CERN and GSI Darmstadt have begun testing the first of two giant magnets that will serve as part of one of the largest and most complex accelerator facilities in the world. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, recently obtained two magnets from GSI. The two magnets weigh a total of 27 tons. About 60 more magnets will follow over the next five years. These ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 4


Probing Mars Equipped with a CCD camera, a temperature probe and a seismic instrument, NASA's robotic system or lander recently landed on Mars. On Nov. 26, the robotic system--dubbed the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight)--landed on Mars after nearly a seven-month, 300-million-mile (485-million-kilometer) journey from Earth. The lander t... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 25


Simulating quarks and gluons The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory is simulating sub-atomic particles on the world’s most powerful supercomputer. The system is simulating these particles at speeds over 70 times faster than the predecessor. More specifically, Oak Ridge is simulating quarks and gluons on the recently-announced Summit supercomputer. In simple terms,... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 26


Gummy bear chips The Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Forschungszentrum Jülich have developed a 3D inkjet printing technique to print electrodes on several soft substrates, including gummy bears. The main application is to develop a new class of sensor-based implants for life sciences. For this application, electrodes or microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are developed and printed on sof... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 3


World's brightest accelerator Japan’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is readying what is considered the world’s most luminous or brightest particle accelerator. The system, dubbed the SuperKEKB, combines an electron-positron collider with a new and advanced detector. The storage ring system is designed to explore and measure rare decays of elementary particles, such... » read more

Supporting Academic Institutions – A Corporate Responsibility?


Innovation is rooted in collaboration, and there’s no better example—when done correctly—than the partnership between the various academic institutes or between the industry and academia. It’s a symbiotic relationship: Companies get access to leading research, ideas and creativity, while universities and research consortia get access to proven technologies, methodologies and experienced... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 22


Weighing protons The Max Planck Institute and Riken have conducted the world’s most precise measurement of the mass of a proton. Based on an experiment, researchers determined that the mass of a proton is 1.007276466583(15)(29) atomic mass units. This is three times more precise than the previous measurements from others. The numbers in parentheses refer to the statistical and systematic ... » read more

← Older posts