What’s What In Advanced Packaging


Ever open the body of your smartphone (perhaps unintentionally) and see small, black rectangles stuck on a circuit board? Those black rectangles are packaged chips. The external chip structure protects the fragile integrated circuits inside, as well as dissipates heat, keeps chips isolated from each other, and, importantly, provides connection to the circuit board and other elements. The manufa... » read more

What’s Missing In Packaging


The growth of advanced packaging on the leading edge of design is inching backwards into older nodes. With most technology—tools, methodologies, materials and processes—this is business as usual. But in packaging, it's both counterintuitive and potentially problematic. The main reason that companies began investing in advanced packaging—OSATs, foundries, chipmakers such as Intel and Qu... » read more

Reliability Of eWLB For Automotive Radar Applications


With shrinking of chip sizes, Wafer Level Chip Scale Packaging (WLCSP) becomes an attractive and holistic packaging solutions with various advantages in comparison to conventional packages, such as Ball Grid Array (BGA) with flipchip or wirebonding. With the advancement of various fan-out (FO) WLPs, it has been proven to be a more optimal, low cost, integrated and reliable solution compared to ... » read more

Advanced Packaging For Automotive Dashboard Application


The current automotive market for the IC (integrated circuit) packaging industry has grown significantly due to the increasing need for automation and higher performance in vehicles. These changes in the automotive market will enable cars to be more reliable and intelligent. To address the increasingly complex demands of the automotive market, the semiconductor packaging industry is shifting it... » read more

Inside Panel-Level Fan-Out Technology


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss panel-level fan-out packaging technology with Tanja Braun, deputy group manager at the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM, and Michael Töpper, business development manager at Fraunhofer IZM. Braun is responsible for the Panel Level Packaging Consortium at Fraunhofer IZM, as well as the group manager for assembly and encap... » read more

Executive Insight: Lip-Bu Tan


Semiconductor Engineering sat down with Lip-Bu Tan, president and CEO of [getentity id="22032" e_name="Cadence"], to discuss disruptions and changes in the semiconductor industry, from machine learning and advance packaging to tools and business. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: What do you see as the next big thing? Tan: Unlike mobility or cell phones, or PCs before th... » read more

The 200mm Equipment Scramble


An explosion in 200mm demand has set off a frenzied search for used semiconductor manufacturing equipment that can be used at older process nodes. The problem is there is not enough used equipment available, and not all of the new or expanding 200mm fabs can afford to pay the premium for refurbished or new equipment. This may sound like a straightforward supply and demand issue, but behind t... » read more

Packaging Enters New Phase


The race is on to make advanced packaging less expensive than shrinking everything down onto the same die—much less expensive, in fact. Following several years of speculation and rather shaky market predictions at the beginning of this decade, packaging houses and foundries spent the last four years proving that packaging really does provide a viable alternative to shrinking die in terms o... » read more

Advanced Packaging Moves To Cars


By Ann Steffora Mutschler and Ed Sperling As automotive OEMs come up to speed on electrification of vehicles, each at their own pace, they are starting to embrace novel packaging approaches as a way to differentiate themselves in an increasingly competitive market. Wirebond used to dominate this market, where most of the chips were relatively unsophisticated and product cycles were slow... » read more

Is 7nm The Last Major Node?


A growing number of design and manufacturing issues are prompting questions about what scaling will really look like beyond 10/7nm, how many companies will be involved, and which markets they will address. At the very least, node migrations will go horizontally before proceeding numerically. There are expected to be more significant improvements at 7nm than at any previous node, so rather th... » read more

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