Solving The Memory Bottleneck


Chipmakers are scrambling to solve the bottleneck between processor and memory, and they are turning out new designs based on different architectures at a rate no one would have anticipated even several months ago. At issue is how to boost performance in systems, particularly those at the edge, where huge amounts of data need to be processed locally or regionally. The traditional approach ha... » read more

Will In-Memory Processing Work?


The cost associated with moving data in and out of memory is becoming prohibitive, both in terms of performance and power, and it is being made worse by the data locality in algorithms, which limits the effectiveness of cache. The result is the first serious assault on the von Neumann architecture, which for a computer was simple, scalable and modular. It separated the notion of a computatio... » read more

Foundries See Growth, New Issues In 2019


The silicon foundry business is poised for growth in 2019, although the industry faces several challenges across a number of market segments next year. Generally, foundry vendors saw steady growth in 2018, but many are ending the year on a sour note. Weak demand for Apple’s new iPhone XR and a downturn in the cryptocurrency market have impacted several IC suppliers and foundries, causing t... » read more

Next-Gen Memory Ramping Up


The next-generation memory market is heating up as vendors ramp a number of new technologies, but there are some challenges in bringing these products into the mainstream. For years, the industry has been working on a variety of memory technologies, including carbon nanotube RAM, FRAM, MRAM, phase-change memory and ReRAM. Some are shipping, while others are in R&D. Each memory type is di... » read more

Hardware Security Threat Rising


Martin Scott, senior vice president and CTO of Rambus, sat down with Semiconductor Engineering to talk about an increasing problem with security, what's driving it, and why hardware is now part of the growing attack surface. What follows are excerpts of that conversation. SE: With Meltdown and Spectre, the stakes have changed because the focus is not on using hardware to get to software. It'... » read more

Developing High-Reliability Reprogrammable NVM IP for Automotive Application


To help IC designers understand the complexities in developing the highest reliability non-volatile memory (NVM) IP for automotive applications, this white paper will review key considerations from design to test, including: key reliability specifications, designing-in reliability, and demonstrating reliability through characterization, qualification, and reliability testing. This paper helps I... » read more

The Black Box In Auto Vehicles


Driving a modern car or truck today is like driving a complex computer system which has the scope to take people and freight from one geographic point to another through the infrastructure and, to do so, it just happens it has an engine and wheels. Among the most significant developments in automotive electronics in the last several years is the inclusion of an EDR (Event Data Recorder) in e... » read more

Fingerprint Sensor Technology And Security Requirements


Biometrics is a technology that uses a human’s biological features, such as facial characteristics, fingerprint patterns, retina, DNA or behaviors (voice and signature) to authenticate a person’s identification and authorize specific actions. Of all of them, fingerprint analysis technology is the most mature and has the widest acceptance. Several factors contribute to fingerprint technol... » read more

Reduced Memory Power For Internet of Things Applications


Memory has historically been a very stable technology, whether volatile or non-volatile. Incremental change happens constantly to improve performance, but it’s unusual for a major change to take place. The non-volatile one-time-programmable memory approach that Kilopass uses has been in place for thirteen years with no major changes. Now, however, Kilopass is readying a new memory array for t... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 19


Ferroelectric non-volatile memory Scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the University of Nebraska, and the University of Lausanne in Switzerland succeeded in growing ultra-thin (2.5-nanometer) ferroelectric films based on hafnium oxide that could potentially be used to develop non-volatile memory elements called ferroelectric tunnel junctions. The film was g... » read more

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