Reliability At 5nm And Below


The best way to figure out how a chip or package will age is to bake it in an oven, heat it in a pressure cooker, and stick it in a freezer. Those are all standard methods to accelerate physical effects and the effects of aging, but it's not clear they will continue working as chips shrink to 5nm and 3nm, or as they are included in multi-die packages. Extending any of those kitchen-like appr... » read more

Reducing Automotive Failure Rates With QPaaS


It’s become an industry cliché to dub modern cars “computers on wheels” – and with 90 percent of automotive innovation now focused on electronics and software, it’s a cliché that happens to be true, and it brings with it the complications that all electronics bring. The sheer number of electronics-driven features – advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), telematics, navigati... » read more

Achieving Functional Safety For Autonomous Vehicle SoC Designs


Autonomous vehicle systems will be expected to meet rigorous safety standards regarding many aspects of system design and performance. One set of these standards, known as functional safety, focuses on the safety and reliability of the electrical and electronic systems within the vehicle, and the system-on-chip (SoC) devices in particular. As the complexity of these devices grows, autonomous ve... » read more

Designing In 4D


The chip design world is no longer flat or static, and increasingly it's no longer standardized. Until 16/14nm, most design engineers viewed the world in two dimensions. Circuits were laid out along x and y axes, and everything was packed in between those two borders. The biggest problems were that nothing printed as neatly as the blueprint suggested, and current leaked out of two-dimension... » read more

A Reliable I/O Ring For A Reliable SoC


What is an input/output (I/O) ring, and why should I care about it? If you’re a system-on-chip (SoC) designer, you had better know the answer to that question. SoCs are the darlings of the semiconductor industry—they combine all the typical functionality of a computer (central processing unit (CPU), memory, input/output (I/O) ports, and storage) on a single chip. They’re particularly popu... » read more

AI’s Impact On Power And Performance


AI/ML is creeping into everything these days. There are AI chips, and there are chips that include elements of AI, particularly for inferencing. The big question is how well they will affect performance and power, and the answer isn't obvious. There are two main phases of AI, the training and the inferencing. Almost all training is done in the cloud using extremely large data sets. In fact, ... » read more

AI’s Blind Spots


The rush to utilize AI/ML in nearly everything and everywhere raises some serious questions about how all of this technology will evolve, age and perform over time. AI is very useful at doing certain tasks, notably finding patterns and relationships in broad data sets that are well beyond the capabilities of the human mind. This is very valuable for adding efficiency into processes of all so... » read more

Different Ways To Improve Chip Reliability


A push toward greater reliability in safety- and mission-critical applications is prompting some innovative approaches in semiconductor design, manufacturing, and post-production analysis of chip behavior. While quality over time has come under intensive scrutiny in automotive, where German carmakers require chips to last 18 years with zero defects, it isn't the only market demanding extende... » read more

Planning For Failures In Automotive


The automotive industry is undergoing some fundamental shifts as it backs away from the traditional siloed approach to one of graceful failure, slowing the evolution to fully autonomy and rethinking how to achieve its goals for a reasonable cost. For traditional automakers, this means borrowing some proven strategies from the electronics world rather than trying to evolve traditional automot... » read more

Emulation Fills The Pre-Silicon Verification Gap For Autonomous Vehicles


Veloce emulators provide the scale and performance to ensure that automotive applications run smoothly, safely, and securely. This paper describes how emulation is used to run realistic driver scenarios, investigate vehicle dynamics, and analyze power and communications metrics — all in a platform that virtualizes the design and allows both hardware and software to be tested together or separ... » read more

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