System Bits: Sept. 18


Better AI technique for chemistry predictions CalTech researchers have found a new technique that uses machine learning more effectively to predict how complex chemicals will react to reagents. The tool is a new twist on similar machine learning techniques to find more effective catalysts without having the time-consuming trial-and-error research, making it a time-saver for drug researchers. ... » read more

Memory Startups To Watch


The next-generation memories are finally ramping up after years’ of delays and promises. Intel, for one, is shipping 3D XPoint, a next-generation technology based on phase-change memory. In addition, the big foundries are readying embedded MRAM. And, of course, there are a number of other players in the next-generation memory arena. There are also a number of startups that are flying un... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 8


Cobalt-free cathodes Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, built lithium-ion battery cathodes without cobalt that can store 50% more energy than traditional cobalt-containing cathodes. Currently, lithium-ion battery cathodes use layered structures, which cobalt is necessary to maintain. When lithium ions move from the cathode to anode during charging, a lot of space is left... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 17


Finding metallic glass Using machine learning techniques, a group of researchers have accelerated the discovery of an alloy called metallic glass. Northwestern University, the Department of Energy’s National Accelerator Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised a shortcut for discovering and improving metallic glass. In metallic glass, the at... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 5


[caption id="attachment_429586" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Vivienne Sze, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT. Source: MIT[/caption] Building deep learning hardware A new course at MIT is bringing together both electrical engineering and computer science to educate student in the highly sought after field of deep learning. Vivienne Sze, an assoc... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 17


WIMP dark matter detector The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Group has taken another step towards finding an elusive part of the universe—dark matter. The LZ Group consists of 250 scientists and engineers from 37 institutions in the U.S., U.K., Portugal, Russia and Korea. In 2012, the group built the so-called Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter detector. The detector is based on a 370 kilogram ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 29


Compact synchrotron EUV sources For some time, the industry has been exploring the development of next-generation power sources for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. ASML and Gigaphoton are separately developing EUV sources based on the more traditional and compact laser-produced-plasma (LPP) technology. Then, in R&D, others are exploring the development of futuristic EUV sources us... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: April 25


Making strange hadrons CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has produced and observed what it says are the world’s first sub-atomic particles called strange hadrons. Strange hadrons are well-known sub-atomic particles with names such as Kaon, Lambda, Xi and Omega, according to CERN. Strange hadrons have never been observed until now. The observation could shed light on su... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 25


Energy-harvesting floor Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a flooring material which can be used as a triboelectric nanogenerator to convert footsteps into electricity. The method uses wood pulp, a common waste material already often used in flooring. The pulp is partly make of cellulose nanofibers, which when chemically treated produce an electrical charge when th... » read more

Joint R&D Has Its Ups And Downs


As corporate spending on research and development dwindles, enterprises are reaching out to colleges and universities to supplement their R&D. And they often are finding eager partners in those endeavors, as professors and their graduate students look for help, financial and technical, in addressing long-term research projects. “Pure research is just a luxury no one can afford anymore,... » read more

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