Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 22


Drawing sensors on skin Researchers from the University of Houston and University of Chicago created an ink pen that can draw multifunctional sensors and circuits directly on skin. These "drawn-on-skin electronics" aim to provide more precise health data, free of the artifacts that are associated with wearable devices and flexible electronic patches. Caused when the sensor doesn't move prec... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 21


AI hardware Researchers at Purdue University, University of California San Diego, Argonne National Laboratory, University of Louisville, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and University of Iowa developed hardware that can learn skills, offloading some of the energy needed by AI software. "Software is taking on most of the challenges in AI. If you could incorporate intelligence into the circui... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 21


Focus-free lens Researchers from the University of Utah developed a new lens that doesn't require focusing. They present it as an alternative to the multiple lenses common in smartphone cameras. "Our flat lenses can drastically reduce the weight, complexity and cost of cameras and other imaging systems, while increasing their functionality," said research team leader Rajesh Menon from the U... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: March 24


Backscatter Wi-Fi radio Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed an ultra-low power Wi-Fi radio they say could enable portable IoT devices. Using 5,000 times less power than standard Wi-Fi radios, the device consumes 28 microwatts while transmitting data at a rate of 2 megabits per second over a range of up to 21 meters. "You can connect your phone, your smart devices, ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 20


Six-angstrom waveguide Engineers at the University of California San Diego, City University of New York, and Johns Hopkins University created the thinnest optical waveguide yet. At only three atoms thick, the team says the waveguide serves as a proof of concept for scaling down optical devices. The waveguide consists of a tungsten disulfide monolayer (made up of one layer of tungsten atoms ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 30


Printed supercapacitors Researchers at Drexel University and Trinity College created ink for an inkjet printer from MXene, a highly conductive two-dimensional material, which could be used to print flexible energy storage components, such as supercapacitors, in any size or shape. The material shows promise as an ink thanks to its high conductivity and ability to apply easily to surfaces usi... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 22


Efficient neural net training Researchers from the University of California San Diego and Adesto Technologies teamed up to improve neural network training efficiency with new hardware and algorithms that allow computation to be performed in memory. The team used an energy-efficient spiking neural network for implementing unsupervised learning in hardware. Spiking neural networks more closel... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Oct. 9


Spray-on antenna Engineers at Drexel University developed a sprayable form of the 2D material MXene that can be used to create antennas on nearly any surface. The antennas perform as well or better than the ones currently used in mobile devices and RFID tags. The MXene titanium carbide can be dissolved in water to create an ink or paint. The exceptional conductivity of the material enables ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 6


Recycling cathodes Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego developed an energy-efficient recycling process that restores used cathodes from spent lithium ion batteries. The process involves harvesting the degraded cathode particles from a used battery and then boiling and heat treating them. In new batteries built with the cathodes, charge storage capacity, charging time and ba... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 9


Eel-inspired power Researchers at the University of Michigan, the University of Fribourg, and the University of California-San Diego developed soft power cells with the potential to power implanted medical devices. Made of hydrogel and salt, the soft cells form the first potentially biocompatible artificial electric organ that generates more than 100 volts at a low current, the team says, enou... » read more

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