Research Bits: June 4


Ultra-pure silicon Researchers from the University of Manchester and University of Melbourne developed a technique to engineer ultra-pure silicon that could be used in the construction of high-performance qubit devices that extend quantum coherence times. The highly purified silicon chips house and protect the qubits so they can sustain quantum coherence much longer, enabling complex calcul... » read more

Research Bits: June 20


Quantum takes a Helium 3 bath A team of researchers from National Physical Laboratory, Royal Holloway University of London, Chalmers University of Technology, and Google have found that immersing superconducting quantum circuits in a bath of Helium-3 (3He) can cool down quantum circuits to almost 100 times lower than was possible before, to achieve under a thousand of a degree above absolute z... » read more

Chip Industry’s Technical Paper Roundup: Dec. 20


New technical papers added to Semiconductor Engineering’s library this week. [table id=71 /] If you have research papers you are trying to promote, we will review them to see if they are a good fit for our global audience. At a minimum, papers need to be well researched and documented, relevant to the semiconductor ecosystem, and free of marketing bias. There is no cost involved for us po... » read more

Graphene Devices: Suppressing Vibrations By Adding Vibrations (FLEET)


A technical paper titled "Passivating Graphene and Suppressing Interfacial Phonon Scattering with Mechanically Transferred Large-Area Ga2O3" was published by researchers at ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (FLEET), Monash University and University of Melbourne. According to FLEET's news article, the research found: -Ultra-thin, liquid-metal-printed oxid... » read more

Research Bits: June 8


Five-second coherence for silicon carbide qubits Researchers from the University of Chicago, National Institutes for Quantum Science and Technology, and Linköping University built a qubit from silicon carbide and was able to retain its coherence, or the length of time the quantum state persists, for over five seconds. “It’s uncommon to have quantum information preserved on these human ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 1


Stronger PUFs Researchers from Ohio State University and Potomac Research propose a new version of physical unclonable functions, or PUFs, that could be used to create secure ID cards, to track goods in supply chains, and as part of authentication applications. "There's a wealth of information in even the smallest differences found on computers chips that we can exploit to create PUFs," sai... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 10


Flexible electrodes for thin films Researchers from the University of Queensland and ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science (University of Melbourne) developed a material for flexible, recyclable, transparent electrodes that could be used in things like solar panels, touchscreens, and smart windows. Eser Akinoglu of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science said, "The performance... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 5


Solar chemical manufacturing Researchers at RMIT University, CSIRO Manufacturing, and University of Melbourne developed a nano-enhanced material that can capture 99% of light and use it to power chemical reactions. One of the world's biggest energy users, the chemical manufacturing industry accounts for about 10% of global energy consumption and 7% of industrial greenhouse gas emissions. In th... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 3


Quantum computer architecture Providing a blueprint to build the long-awaited, large-scale quantum computer, University of New South Wales (UNSW) and University of Melbourne researchers have designed a 3D silicon chip architecture based on single atom quantum bits that they said is compatible with atomic-scale fabrication techniques. Headquartered at UNSW, researchers from the Australian R... » read more