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The Week In Review: Manufacturing

It’s official: IBM appears to be exiting the chip business. After months of talks, IBM has agreed to pay GlobalFoundries $1.5 billion to take Big Blue’s chip unit off its hands, according to reports from Bloomberg. IBM will also receive $200 million worth of assets, according to the reports. At the upcoming IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), Intel and IBM will present... » read more



Litho Options Sparse After 10nm

Leading-edge foundries are ramping up their 16nm/14nm logic processes, with 10nm and 7nm in R&D. Barring a major breakthrough in [getkc id="80" comment="lithography"], chipmakers will use 193nm immersion and multiple patterning for both 16nm/14nm and 10nm. So now, chipmakers are focusing on the lithography options for 7nm. As before, the options include the usual suspects—[gettech id="... » read more



ATE Market Gets More Crowded

Over the years, the automatic test equipment (ATE) industry has undergone a dramatic shakeout. In fact, the ATE industry has shrunk from about a dozen major vendors several years ago to just three sizable companies today. There is also a smattering of smaller ATE players in the market. In other words, the big ATE vendors became bigger and the mid-sized players were gobbled up. The consol... » read more



Challenges Mount For EUV Masks

Five years ago, Intel urged the industry to invest millions of dollars in the photomask infrastructure to help enable extreme ultraviolet ([gettech id="31045" comment="EUV"]) lithography. At the time, there were noticeable gaps in EUV, namely defect-free masks and inspection tools. To date, however, Intel’s call to action has produced mixed results. The photomask industry is making progr... » read more



Executive Insight: Aki Fujimura

Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss photomask technology and lithography trends with Aki Fujimura, chairman and chief executive of D2S. SE: What are the big challenges that keep you awake at night? Fujimura: Mask technology, and the investments in the mask industry, are increasingly important. But so far, the investment dollars that the community is willing to spend on it isn’... » read more



Time To Look At SOI Again

Chipmakers have the luxury of looking at several process options when developing chips at the 28nm node and beyond. Using bulk CMOS, for example, chipmakers can scale planar transistors down to 20nm. Then, at 20nm, planar runs out of gas due to the so-called short-channel effect. At that point, IC makers must migrate towards finFETs at 16nm/14nm and beyond. Another process option is fully... » read more



Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 14

Toyota’s power steering IC Today’s cars are making use of more electronics. The increase in electronic content is driving the need for high temperature and high voltage chips. The electric power steering (EPS) system is one example. EPS provides power assist even when the engine is stopped. It also improves fuel economy compared to hydraulic power steering, according to automotive giant... » read more



The Week In Review: Manufacturing

Samsung Electronics signed a memorandum of understanding to construct a new semiconductor fab in the company’s Godeok Industrial Complex in Pyeongtaek. The construction of the new semiconductor fabrication plant will begin during the first half of 2015, and operations are scheduled to begin sometime during the second half of 2017. United Microelectronics Corp. (UMC) will participate in a t... » read more



Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 7

Europe’s TFET project A new European project has revealed more details about its plans to develop a next-generation chip technology called tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). EPFL is coordinating this new European research project, dubbed E2SWITCH. The project also includes IBM, Forschungszentrum Jülich, the University of Lund, ETHZ, Imec, CCS, SCIPROM and IUNET. The project has be... » read more



The Week In Review: Manufacturing

Jimmy Kimmel, comedian and late night host of Jimmy Kimmel Live, replaces Lily Collins (Mirror, Mirror) as McAfee’s most dangerous celebrity to search for online. Cybercriminals are looking for ways to take advantage of consumer interest around popular cultural events. These criminals capitalize on the public’s fascination with celebrities to lure them to sites laden with malware, which ena... » read more



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