Manufacturing Bits: March 19


Exascale computers Intel and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have set plans to develop and deliver the first exascale supercomputer in the United States. The system, called Aurora, will provide an exaFLOP of performance or a quintillion floating point computations per second. Targeted for delivery in 2021, the system is being developed at DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory. The system ... » read more

System Bits: March 19


Nanomesh material could find use in sustainable applications Imec collaborated with KU Leuven to develop a nanomesh material made of a 3D structure with nanowires. This material could prove to make batteries more energy-efficient, while also improving catalytic converters and fuel cells, and making hydrogen production easier. The research team is touting the 3D nanometer-scale metal grid st... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 19


Explainable AI Researchers from Technische Universität Berlin (TU Berlin), Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI), and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) propose a pair of algorithms to help determine how AI systems reach their conclusions. Explainable AI is an important step towards practical applications, argued Klaus-Robert Müller, Professor for Machine Learning at... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 11


Measuring molecules The Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a new metrology technique that determines the properties of individual molecules. The technique, called single-molecule excitation–emission spectroscopy, improves upon the traditional methods to explore molecules. The traditional method, dubbed single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS), is not new and is used to analyze f... » read more

System Bits: March 11


Cryptography IC for the IoT Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers report their development of a cryptographic circuit that could be used to protect low-power Internet of Things devices when quantum computing takes hold. [caption id="attachment_24144905" align="alignleft" width="300"] Image Credit: MIT[/caption] The research team presented a paper at the 2019 International Sol... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 11


Reading qubits faster Researchers at Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland propose a faster way to read information from qubits, the building blocks of quantum computers. Currently, they are extremely sensitive to disruption even in cryogenic environments, holding quantum information for less than a millisecond. In the method now used to read information from a qubit... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: March 5


WAAM process Thales Alenia Space, Cranfield University and Glenalmond Technologies have produced a prototype of a titanium pressure vessel for use in future space missions. The vessel is 1 meter in height and weighs 8.5kg. The titanium alloy is made using Cranfield’s additive technology, dubbed the Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) process. Related to 3D printing technology, WA... » read more

System Bits: March 5


The new electronics field of magnonics Transistors keep shrinking to dimensions that are difficult to fabricate. There is doubt in the semiconductor industry about the possibility of producing 1-nanometer features with existing process technology. The answer may lie in magnonic currents: quasi-particles associated with waves of magnetization, or spin waves, in magnetic materials. Researcher... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Mar. 5


Solar chemical manufacturing Researchers at RMIT University, CSIRO Manufacturing, and University of Melbourne developed a nano-enhanced material that can capture 99% of light and use it to power chemical reactions. One of the world's biggest energy users, the chemical manufacturing industry accounts for about 10% of global energy consumption and 7% of industrial greenhouse gas emissions. In th... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Feb. 26


Vitamin C chips Using vitamin C, Rice University has developed a process that turns gold nanorods into small gold nanowires. Nanorods are a type of structure, while nanowires are simply tiny wires. With the technology, Rice is able to produce nanowires with various lengths. These can be used in electronics as well as light-manipulating applications like plasmons. A “plasmon is a quantum o... » read more

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