Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 15


Self-collapse lithography The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) has developed a technology called self-collapse lithography. The technology, reported in the journal Nano Letters, resembles the combination of nanoimprint, selective removal and a chemical lift-off process. More specifically, though, the technology provides insights into patterning using a chemical lift-off lith... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 15


Machine-learning system for smoother streaming To combat the frustration of video buffering or pixelation, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed “Pensieve,” an artificial intelligence system that uses machine learning to pick different algorithms depending on network conditions thereby delivering a higher-quality streaming exp... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 15


Solar sunglasses Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed sunglasses with colored, semitransparent organic solar cells applied onto the lenses capable of supplying a microprocessor and two displays with electric power. The solar cell lenses, perfectly fitted to a commercial frame, have a thickness of approx. 1.6 millimeters and weigh about six grams, just like th... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 8


Ferroelectric films Ferroelectric RAM (FRAM) is creating a buzz again. For years, FRAMs have been shipping for embedded applications, although the technology has taken a backseat to MRAM, phase-change and ReRAM. Using a ferroelectric capacitor to store data, FRAM is a nonvolatile memory with unlimited endurance. FRAM is faster than EEPROM and flash. FRAM performs an over-write function in ... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 8


Improving robot vision, virtual reality, self-driving cars In order to generate information-rich images and video frames that will enable robots to better navigate the world and understand certain aspects of their environment, such as object distance and surface texture, engineers at Stanford University and the University of California San Diego have developed a camera that generates 4D images... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 8


Energy-efficient neural nets Researchers from MIT developed new techniques for more energy-efficient neural networks, offering as much as a 73% reduction in power consumption over the standard implementation of neural networks, and as much as a 43% reduction over the best previous method for paring the networks down. First, they developed an analytic method that can determine how much power... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Aug. 1


Magnetic chips HRL Laboratories—an R&D venture between Boeing and General Motors—has been awarded a contract to develop a new class of magnetic integrated components. HRL has received the award from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) under the Magnetic, Miniaturized, and Monolithically Integrated Components (M3IC) program. The goal is to develop new magnetic materials... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 1


Quantum Computing Takes A Step Forward UCLA physicists have developed a technique for measuring and controlling the energy differences of electron valley states in silicon quantum dots, which they view as a key component of quantum computing. Joshua Schoenfield, a UCLA graduate student and one of the paper's authors, explained that "an individual qubit can exist in a complex wave-like m... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Aug. 1


Concentrating photovoltaics Engineers at Penn State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tested a new concentrating photovoltaic solar system, which they say can produce over 50% more energy per day than standard silicon solar cells. In contrast to silicon solar panels, which currently dominate the market at 15 to 20 percent efficiency, concentrating photovoltaics (... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 25


Metrology for the intelligence community The semiconductor industry continues to move full speed ahead with traditional chip scaling. There are several challenges in the arena. One of the big but lessor known challenges is metrology. Metrology, the science of characterizing and measuring films and structures, is becoming more complex, challenging and expensive at each node. Looking to solv... » read more

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