Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 14


Tracking cell movement Using a technology called cyro-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) have gained a better understanding of how cells move in living organisms. Cells, the basic building blocks of living things, need to move. Moving cells help enable embryonic develop... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 14


Integrated photonics platform Researchers at Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences came up with an integrated photonics platform capable of storing light and electrically controlling its frequency or color through a microchip. Mian Zhang, first author of the resulting paper, says, “Many quantum photonic and classical optics applications require shifting of op... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 14


Optical memory Researchers at the University of Oxford, University of Exeter, and University of Münster propose an all-optical memory cell that can store more optical data, 5 bits, in a smaller space than was previously possible on-chip. The optical memory cell uses light to encode information in the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5. A laser causes the material to change between ordered and... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 8


Atom interferometry NASA and AOSense have demonstrated a prototype quantum sensor that uses a measurement technique called atom interferometry. The technology could one day enable more accurate gravitational measurements, climate-monitoring missions in space and other applications. Originally developed in the 1980s, atom interferometry is like today’s optical interferometry. Used in sc... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 8


Measure twice, cut once University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers are working with a robotic device that can perform laparoscopic surgery through a single incision, an operation that typically requires five or six small incisions. The device is called the SP Robot, developed by Intuitive Surgical. It features four arms that go into the body through a 1-inch incision. UT South... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 8


Ferrimagnetic memory Engineers at the National University of Singapore, Toyota Technological Institute, and Korea University propose a new type of spintronic memory that is 20 times more efficient and 10 times more stable than commercial ones. In spintronic devices, data is stored depending on up or down magnetic states. Current devices based on ferromagnets, however, suffer from a few issu... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 2


Better nanowire MOSFETs At the recent IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), Imec and Applied Materials presented a paper on a new and improved way to fabricate vertically stacked gate-all-around MOSFETs. More specifically, Imec and Applied reported on process improvements for a silicon nanowire MOSFET, which is integrated in a CMOS dual work function metal replacement metal ga... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 2


High-temp electronics Researchers at Purdue University, UC Santa Cruz, and Stanford developed a semiconducting plastic capable of operating at extreme temperatures. The new material, which combines both a semiconducting organic polymer and a conventional insulating organic polymer could reliably conduct electricity in up to 220 degrees Celsius (428 F). "One of the plastics transports the ch... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 2


Princeton plumbs blockchain technology Researchers at Princeton University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science are looking at how blockchain technology can provide secure financial transactions, among other applications. “Early on we realized this was a technology that was not well understood but that a lot of people were interested in,” says Ed Felten, the Robert E. Kahn Profess... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 26


Polymer pen litho Using a polymer pen lithography technique, the Air Force Research Laboratory and Northwestern University have developed a quick way to discover new materials. Researchers have developed a combinatorial library of tiny nanoparticles on a substrate. A combinatorial library, sometimes referred to as a megalibrary, is a collection of different structures. Each structure is enc... » read more

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