Solving Puzzling Power-Aware Coverage: Getting An Aggregated Coverage Metric


Coverage metrics tell us when a design has been thoroughly verified, or at least exercised to the point of diminishing returns. Rarely can every design artifact or design parameter of a highly complex design be covered 100 percent, but we can use coverage metrics to know the extent to which we have verified the design — enough to be confident that it will function as desired in the end produc... » read more

Low Power Coverage: The Missing Piece In Dynamic Simulation


Through real design examples and case studies, this paper demonstrates how to achieve comprehensive low power design verification closure with all possible sources of power states, their transition coverage, and cross-coverage of power domains of interdependent states. As well the paper proposes a mechanism to combine and represent LP and non-LP coverage in a unified and adaptable database with... » read more

The Race To Zero Defects


By Jeff Dorsch and Ed Sperling Testing chips is becoming more difficult, more time-consuming, and much more critical—particularly as these chips end up in cars, industrial automation, and a variety of edge devices. Now the question is how to provide enough test coverage to ensure that chips will work as expected without slowing down the manufacturing process or driving up costs. Balanci... » read more

Low Power Coverage


Through real design examples and case studies, this paper demonstrates how to achieve comprehensive low power design verification closure with all possible sources of power states, their transition coverage, and cross-coverage of power domains of interdependent states. As well the paper proposes a mechanism to combine and represent LP and non-LP coverage in a unified and adaptable database with... » read more

Three Steps To Low Power Coverage Closure


By Awashesh Kumar and Madhur Bhargava Low-power design and verification is becoming more complex. Yet it is critical that all power elements are verified, and it is even more important to verify the complex interactions between these elements at a high abstraction level. However, power-aware coverage closure is difficult to attain and complex by nature. Existing low-power coverage methodo... » read more

Inside UVM, Take Three


The reason why UVM came up with such phases is because synchronization among all design-testbench was necessary. Using Verilog and VHDL, verification engineers did not have facilities such as clocking block or run phases. Now, it is very important that the time at which test vectors applied from test-bench reaches the Design Under Test(DUT) at the same time. If timing for different signals vari... » read more

Can Big Data Help Coverage Closure?


Semiconductor designs are a combination of very large numbers and very small numbers. There is a large numbers of transistors at very small sizes, and databases are often large. The chip industry has been looking at [getkc id="305" kc_name="machine learning"] to effectively manage some of this data, but so far datasets have not been properly tagged across the industry and there is a reluctan... » read more

Raising SoC Development Productivity With Portable Stimulus


The semiconductor industry has achieved significant productivity increases by virtue of the development, deployment, and scalability of reusable design IP. The EDA industry has also achieved significant productivity increases by virtue of the development, deployment, and scalability of reusable verification IP. A remaining bottleneck in the SoC development process stems from the inability to re... » read more

Is Verification Falling Behind?


Every year that [getkc id="74" comment="Moore's Law"] is in effect means that the [getkc id="10" kc_name="verification"] task gets larger and more complex. At one extreme, verification complexity increases at the square of design complexity, but that assumes that every state in the design is usable and unique. On the other hand, verification has not had the luxury that comes with design reuse b... » read more

Big Challenges, Changes For Debug


By Ann Steffora Mutschler & Ed Sperling Debugging a chip always has been difficult, but the problem is getting worse at 7nm and 5nm. The number of corner cases is exploding as complexity rises, and some bugs are not even on anyone's radar until well after devices are already in use by end customers. An estimated 39% of verification engineering time is spent on debugging activities the... » read more

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