System Bits: Aug. 22


Bioimaging technique tracks multiple in vivo interactions To make it possible to quickly and economically monitor multiple molecular interactions in a large area of living tissue – such as an organ or a small animal — Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers have created an approach to optical imaging that could have applications in medical diagnosis, guided surgery, or pre-clinical dr... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Q&A Francine Berman, a computer science professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, talks about ethical issues in the Internet of Things in this interview. She says, “First of all, we’re just at the tip of the iceberg in what is arguably going to be a brave new world. And it’s highly heterogeneous: We’ll be seeing a lot more autonomous systems, we’ll be seeing enhanced humans and ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 21


A chip with 1,000 processors A microchip containing 1,000 independent programmable processors has been designed by a team at the University of California, Davis. Called the KiloCore chip, it contains 621 million transistors and was fabricated by IBM using its 32nm CMOS technology. Cores operate at an average maximum clock frequency of 1.78 GHz, and they transfer data directly to each other r... » read more

System Bits: April 5


Encoding electrons with valleytronics Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a new type of electronics that could lead to faster and more efficient computer logic systems and data storage chips in next-generation devices that they refer to as “valleytronics.” Specifically, the team has experimentally demonstra... » read more

Brain-Inspired Computing


Approaching power/performance tradeoffs from an architectural perspective is essential given the complexities of today’s SoCs. And beyond some traditional techniques that I discussed in a recent article, Bernard Murphy, CTO at Atrenta mentioned that there is currently a lot of buzz about using non-Von Neumann architectures — especially for recognition functions (voice, image and text). ... » read more