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System Bits: Oct. 2


Computer algorithms exhibit prejudice based on datasets Researchers at Cardiff University and MIT have shown that groups of autonomous machines are capable of demonstrating prejudice by identifying, copying, and learning this behavior from one another. The team noted that while it may seem that prejudice is a human-specific phenomenon that requires human cognition to form an opinion of, or ... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 21


Two types of computers create faster, less energy-intensive image processor for autonomous cars, security cameras, medical devices Stanford University researchers reminded that the image recognition technology that underlies today’s autonomous cars and aerial drones depends on artificial intelligence. These are the computers that essentially teach themselves to recognize objects like a dog, ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 31


Training optical neural networks Researchers from Stanford University used an optical chip to train an artificial neural network, a step that could lead to faster, more efficient AI tasks. Although optical neural networks have been recently demonstrated, the training step was performed using a model on a traditional digital computer and the final settings were then imported into the optical... » read more

System Bits: July 24


Computers that mimic the human brain According to a group of researchers led by the Jülich Research Centre in Germany, a computer built to mimic the brain’s neural networks produces similar results to that of the best brain-simulation supercomputer software currently used for neural-signaling research. The custom-built computer named SpiNNaker, which the team said has been tested for ac... » read more

Data Center Power Poised To Rise


The big power-saving effort that kept U.S. data-center power consumption low for the past decade may not keep the lid on much longer. Faced with the possibility that data centers would consume a disastrously large percentage of the world's power supply, data center owners, and players in the computer, semiconductor, power and cooling industries ramped up effort to improve the efficiency of e... » read more

System Bits: May 29


Ultra-low-power sensors carrying genetically engineered bacteria to detect gastric bleeding In order to diagnose bleeding in the stomach or other gastrointestinal problems, MIT researchers have built an ingestible sensor equipped with genetically engineered bacteria. [caption id="attachment_24134598" align="alignleft" width="300"] MIT engineers have designed an ingestible sensor equipped with... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: May 22


Exotic water The Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) organization, Uppsala University and SLAC have turned a large X-ray laser into the world’s fastest water heater. Using an X-ray free-electron laser from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have heated water from room temperature to 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond or a millionth of a mil... » read more

System Bits: May 22


AI disruptions and benefits in the workplace According to Stanford University researchers, artificial intelligence offers both promise and peril as it revolutionizes the workplace, the economy and personal lives. Visiting scholar James Timbie of the Hoover Institution, who studies artificial intelligence and other technologies, said that in the workplace of tomorrow, many routine jobs now p... » read more

System Bits: May 8


Unlocking the brain Stanford University researchers recently reminded that for years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and now AI is starting to return the favor: while not explicitly designed to do so, certain AI systems seem to mimic our brains’ inner workings more closely than previously thought. [caption id="attach... » read more

System Bits: April 10


Ultrafast laser beam steering for autonomous cars Researchers at Purdue University and Stanford University reported they have found a novel laser light sensing technology that is more robust and less expensive than currently available with a wide range of uses, including a way to guide fully autonomous vehicles. The team said this innovation is orders of magnitude faster than conventional l... » read more

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