In-Memory Computing Challenges Come Into Focus


For the last several decades, gains in computing performance have come by processing larger volumes of data more quickly and with superior precision. Memory and storage space are measured in gigabytes and terabytes now, not kilobytes and megabytes. Processors operate on 64-bit rather than 8-bit chunks of data. And yet the semiconductor industry’s ability to create and collect high quality ... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 14


Integrated photonics platform Researchers at Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences came up with an integrated photonics platform capable of storing light and electrically controlling its frequency or color through a microchip. Mian Zhang, first author of the resulting paper, says, “Many quantum photonic and classical optics applications require shifting of op... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 26


Adding learning to computer vision UCLA’s Samueli School of Engineering and Stanford University are working on advanced computer vision technology, using artificial intelligence to help vision systems learn to identify faces, objects and other things on their own, without training by humans. The research team breaks up images into chunks they call “viewlets,” then they have the computer ... » read more

System Bits: Dec. 18


AI studies at Stanford Language processing is a leading area in artificial intelligence research, Stanford University reports. “We’re trying to inform the conversation about artificial intelligence with hard data,” says Yoav Shoham, professor of computer science, emeritus, adding, “Language is the ultimate frontier of AI research because you can express any thought or idea in langua... » read more

Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto


Internet of Things Lowe’s, the home improvement retailer, is giving up on the smart home market. The company is putting its Iris Smart Home business up for sale as part of a reorganization. The retailer made a big splash at CES 2015 with its Innovation Lab offerings, which included retail service robots and the Holoroom “home improvement simulator.” The Iris product line includes multipl... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 27


Silent, lightweight aircraft powered by ionic wind Instead of propellers or turbines, MIT researchers have built and flown the first-ever aircraft with no moving parts that is powered by an “ionic wind” — a silent but mighty flow of ions that is produced aboard the plane, and that generates enough thrust to propel the plane over a sustained, steady flight. [caption id="attachment_2414... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 20


Designing transistors that don’t overheat In order to avoid heat-induced voids and cracking that can cause chips and circuits to fail, Stanford University and University of California at Davis researchers have developed a way to not only manage heat, but help route it away from delicate devices that leverages a thermal transistor, which is a nanoscale switch that can conduct heat away from ... » read more

System Bits: Nov. 6


Keeping data private To preserve privacy during data collection from the Internet, Stanford University researchers have developed a new technique that maintains personal privacy given that the many devices part of our daily lives collect information about how we use them. Stanford computer scientists Dan Boneh and Henry Corrigan-Gibbs created the Prio method for keeping collected data priva... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 23


Adapting machine learning for use in scientific research To better tailor machine learning for effective use in scientific research, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a collaborative grant to a group of researchers, including UC Santa Barbara mathematician Paul Atzberger, to establish a new data science research center. According to UCSB, the Physics-Informed Learning Machines for M... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 2


Computer algorithms exhibit prejudice based on datasets Researchers at Cardiff University and MIT have shown that groups of autonomous machines are capable of demonstrating prejudice by identifying, copying, and learning this behavior from one another. The team noted that while it may seem that prejudice is a human-specific phenomenon that requires human cognition to form an opinion of, or ... » read more

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