Power/Performance Bits: Dec. 9


Solar capture and storage Researchers at the University of Houston developed a device capable of both capturing and storing solar energy. Unlike solar panels and solar cells, which rely on photovoltaic technology for the direct generation of electricity, the hybrid device captures heat from the sun and stores it as thermal energy. The device combines molecular energy storage and latent heat... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Oct. 1


3D balloon printing Using an elastomeric or stretchy balloon, the University of Houston and the University of Colorado have developed a new 3D printing method as a means to develop three-dimensional curvy electronic products. The technology involves the field of 3D printing, sometimes known as additive manufacturing (AM). In 3D printing, the goal is to develop parts layer-by-layer using mat... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 5


Algorithm could advance quantum computing Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory report the development of a quantum computing algorithm that promises to provide a better understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, enabling model systems for biological proteins and other advanced applications. “The quantum-to-classical transition occurs when you add more and more parti... » read more

System Bits: Feb. 5


Rubbery material for stretchable electronics Researchers at the University of Houston came up with a rubbery semiconducting material that they say could find applications in stretchable electronics, such as human-machine interfaces, implantable bioelectronics, and robotic skins. Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Houston and correspo... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 13


ML identifies LED material Researchers at the University of Houston created a machine learning algorithm that can predict a material's properties to help find better host material candidates for LED lighting. One recommendation was synthesized and tested. The technique, a support vector machine regression model, was efficient enough to run on a personal computer. It scanned a list of 118,28... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 16


Bacterial solar Researchers at the University of British Columbia developed a solar cell that uses bacteria to convert light to energy. The cell worked as efficiently in dim light as in bright light, making solar a potential option in areas of the world that frequently have overcast skies. Called biogenic cells, they work by utilizing the natural dye that bacteria use for photosynthesis. Pr... » read more

Non-Traditional Chips Gaining Steam


Flexible hybrid electronics are beginning to roll out in the form of medical devices, wearable electronics and even near-field communications tags in retail, setting the stage for a whole new wave of circuit design, manufacturing and packaging that reaches well beyond traditional chips. FHE devices begin with substrates made of ceramics, glass, plastic, polyimide, polymers, polysilicon, stai... » read more