Power/Performance Bits: July 14


5G switches Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and University of Lille built a new radio frequency switch that could save power in 5G devices when not actively jumping between different networks and spectrum frequencies. “It has become clear that the existing switches consume significant amounts of power, and that power consumed is useless power,” said Deji Akinwande, a ... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 5


CMOS-compatible laser Researchers at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (C2N), STMicroelectronics, and CEA-Leti Grenoble developed a CMOS-compatible laser for optical data transfer. Comprised of germanium and tin, the efficiency is comparable with conventional GaAs semiconductor lasers on Si. Optical communications provide much higher data rates, and are be... » read more

System Bits: June 18


Another win for aUToronto Photo credit: University of Toronto The University of Toronto’s student-led self-driving car team racked up its second consecutive victory last month at the annual AutoDrive Challenge in Ann Arbor, Mich. The three-year challenge goes out to North American universities, offering a Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicle to outfit with autonomous driving technology.... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: May 14


Detecting malware with power monitoring Engineers at the University of Texas at Austin and North Carolina State University devised a way to detect malware in large-scale embedded computer systems by monitoring power usage and identifying unusual surges as a warning of potential infection. The method relies on an external piece of hardware that can be plugged into the system to observe and m... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 29


Thermal lithography Using a technique called thermal scanning probe lithography, New York University (NYU) and others have reported a breakthrough in fabricating 2D semiconductors. With the technology, researchers have devised metal electrodes with vanishing Schottky barriers on 2D semiconductors based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂). Thermal scanning probe lithography, sometimes called t-... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Nov. 20


Predicting crystal structures A group of researchers have improved a crystal structure prediction algorithm, enabling the ability to develop new crystal structures and compounds at faster rates. In 2005, Artem Oganov, now a professor at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), developed a crystal structure predic... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 3


Maintaining an unstable quantum system In an experiment that could have implications for quantum computers and quantum simulators, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have demonstrated a way to maintain an unstable quantum system by applying bursts of microwave radiation – a quantum analog to vibrating the inverted pendulum. While a simple pendulum has two equilibrium point... » read more