Who’s Responsible For Security Breaches?


Semiconductor Engineering sat down to discuss industry attitudes towards safety and security with Dave Kelf, chief marketing officer for Breker Verification; Jacob Wiltgen, solutions architect for functional safety at Mentor, a Siemens Business; David Landoll, solutions architect for OneSpin Solutions; Dennis Ciplickas, vice president of characterization solutions at PDF Solutions; Andrew Dauma... » read more

Using Synopsys Z01X To Accelerate The Fault Injection Campaign Of A Fully Configurable IP


By Arteris IP Alexis Boutillier, Corporate Application Manager, Safety Manager, and Mohan Krishnareddy, Solution Engineer, at the Synopsys Users Group (SNUG), March 2018, Santa Clara, CA. Principles and real-world practices of ISO 26262 for semiconductor design teams. After providing an overview of how functional safety affects management, development, and supporting processes, the paper exp... » read more

How To Build An Automotive Chip


The introduction of advanced electronics into automotive design is causing massive disruption in a supply chain that, until very recently, hummed along like a finely tuned sports car. The rapid push toward autonomous driving has changed everything. This year, Level 3 autonomy will begin hitting the streets, and behind the scenes, work is underway to design SoCs for Level 4. But how these chi... » read more

Functional Safety And Requirements Engineering


Currently, dramatically increasing design costs are being reported for safety-critical applications. This is caused by additional necessary actions to implement and verify functional safety requirements. Such requirements are appearing with a clearly increasing tendency in the area of mobility (automotive, transport, aerospace) as well as in industrial automation and medical technology. In many... » read more

ADAS Further Extends 7nm Challenges


As we discussed previously on the LPHP blog, 7nm nodes hold great promise for reducing power, improving performance and increasing density for next-generation chips, but also present a set of engineering challenges. When you factor in the standards set for autonomous vehicles (AV) and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) system-on-chips or SoCs, those challenges can more than double. Autom... » read more

Adding Safety Into Automotive Design


The ISO 26262 spec is a household term for anyone even remotely involved with the automotive industry today. Increasingly, though, it is being used interchangeably with safety-readiness across the entire supply chain. ISO 26262 compliance is a prerequisite for IP and chips used in an increasing number of automotive applications. It applies to systems, software, and to individual products. An... » read more

Enabling Integrated ADAS Domain Controllers With Automotive IP


Traditionally, the electronic control units (ECUs) for individual Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) applications have been placed throughout the car. The latest automotive architecture will integrate ECUs for multiple ADAS applications into centralized domains to combine multiple ADAS functions. The new class of integrated domain controller ECUs utilize data transferred from the car’s ... » read more

Functional Safety: A Way Of Life


Rejuvenated over the holidays and back in full swing. This might be TMI, but I have been doing some meditative yoga and I seemed to have finally discovered myself. Though I am partly kidding, it does bring us to theme for this blog. As we tackle a new year and all the challenges it brings, I have been engaged with mindfulness and meditative yoga, which looks at a holistic approach to bring t... » read more

Safety Plus Security: A New Challenge


Nobody has ever integrated safety or security features into their design just because they felt like it. Usually, successive high-profile attacks are needed to even get an industry's attention. And after that, it's not always clear how to best implement solutions or what the tradeoffs are between cost, performance, and risk versus benefit. Putting safety and security in the same basket is a ... » read more

Why Auto Designs Take So Long


Designing chips for the automotive market is adding significant overhead, particularly for chips with stringent safety requirements. On the verification side it could result in an additional 6 to 12 months of work. On the design side, developing the same processor in the mobile market would take 6 fewer man months. And when it comes to complex electronic control units (ECUs) or [getkc id="81... » read more

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