Mitigating The Effects Of Radiation On Advanced Automotive ICs


The safety considerations in an automotive IC application have similarities to what is seen in other safety critical industries, such as the avionics, space, and industrial sectors. ISO 26262 is the state-of-the-art safety standard guiding the safety activities and work products required for electronics deployed in an automotive system. ISO 26262 requires that a design be protected from the eff... » read more

Building A Safety Verification Flow


Sal Alvarez, senior manager of application engineering at Synopsys, explains how safety verification differs from functional verification, what changes with failure mode effects analysis, and how to determine and verify the effectiveness of safety features. » read more

Automating Failure Mode Analysis For Automotive Safety


By Chuck Battikha and Doug Smith If you’ve ever had to create a Failure Modes, Effects and Diagnostic Analysis (FMEDA), you know how difficult and painstaking a task it can be. But FMEDAs are essential in ensuring that your SoCs satisfy ISO 26262 functional safety analysis requirements for automotive designs and for demonstrating that your design is indeed safe. Because of the intens... » read more

Automotive Chip Design Workflow


Stewart Williams, senior technical marketing manager at Synopsys, talks about the consolidation of chips in a vehicle and the impact of 7/5nm on automotive SoC design, how to trade off power, performance, area and reliability, and how ISO 26262 impacts those variables. » read more

Push-Button FMEDAs for Automotive Safety


Automotive designs require functional safety analysis, typically accomplished using Failure Modes, Effects and Diagnostic Analysis (FMEDA), used to determine each safety goal’s diagnostic coverage. Writing an FMEDA is a highly tedious task, so we share a push-button solution for creating and automating the FMEDA process, giving engineers more time to focus on exploring design safety readiness... » read more

Using Automotive IP For Easier Integration Of Safety Into SoCs


By Shivakumar Chonnad and Vladimir Litovtchenko Today’s SoCs for automotive safety-related systems integrate numerous IP blocks. At the system level, the Hardware Software Interface (HSI) between these IP blocks needs to be verified in simulation and validated in prototype. However, the scaling of the scope and effort to verify or validate is not linear based on the growing complexity of S... » read more

Functional Safety Verification For AV SoC Designs Accelerated With Advanced Tools


Autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be the culmination of dozens of highly complex systems, incorporating state-of-the-art technologies in electronics hardware, sensors, software, and more. Conceiving and designing these systems is certain to be one of the greatest challenges for today’s engineers. The only greater challenge will be convincing a wary public that these automated systems are safer d... » read more

ISO 26262:2018 Fault Analysis In Safety Mechanisms


Authors: Jörg Grosse1, Mark Hampton1, Sergio Marchese1, Jörg Koch2, Neil Rattray1, Alin Zagardan2 1OneSpin Solutions, Munich, Germany 2Renesas Electronics Europe, Duesseldorf, Germany ISO 26262-5 requires the determination of hardware safety metrics, including SPFM and LFM. Latent and residual diagnostic coverage are also important metrics to assess the effectiveness of safety mechanisms... » read more

Week In Review: Design, Low Power


Micron acquired FWDNXT, an AI software and hardware startup. Founded in 2017 and based in Lafayette, Indiana, FWDNXT, specializes in building machine learning deep neural network inference accelerators scalable from edge devices to server-class performance as Xilinx FPGAs, SoCs, or SDK. The company's engine already powers Micron's Deep Learning Accelerator (DLA) technology. “FWDNXT is an a... » read more

Is Your Functional Safety An Afterthought?


Imagine the air bag in your car not inflating during a collision or deploying without a crash during driving! These are two of the failure modes associated with the air bag in your car, none of which you as a driver have any control over. The severity of both these failures is of course very high, but which one would you rate as a higher hazard? The probability of getting into an accident is lo... » read more

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