Chip Industry’s Technical Paper Roundup: Apr. 18


New technical papers recently added to Semiconductor Engineering’s library: [table id=93 /]   If you have research papers you are trying to promote, we will review them to see if they are a good fit for our global audience. At a minimum, papers need to be well researched and documented, relevant to the semiconductor ecosystem, and free of marketing bias. There is no cost involv... » read more

New Group Of Non-vdW 2D Materials Derived From Non-Layered Crystals Exhibiting Ultra Low Exfoliation Energies


A new technical paper titled "A New Group of 2D Non-van der Waals Materials with Ultra Low Exfoliation Energies" was published by TU Dresden, HZDR, and Aalto University. Abstract: "The exfoliation energy—quantifying the energy required to extract a two-dimensional (2D) sheet from the surface of a bulk material—is a key parameter determining the synthesizability of 2D compounds. Here, ... » read more

Research Bits: June 8


Five-second coherence for silicon carbide qubits Researchers from the University of Chicago, National Institutes for Quantum Science and Technology, and Linköping University built a qubit from silicon carbide and was able to retain its coherence, or the length of time the quantum state persists, for over five seconds. “It’s uncommon to have quantum information preserved on these human ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 26


EU FIB project The European Union (EU) has launched a new project to develop next-generation structures and materials using focused ion beam (FIB) systems. The EU project, dubbed Focused Ion Technology for Nanomaterials or FIT4NANO, is spearheaded by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) organization. The project aims to bring European researchers and companies together to develop... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 25


Thinner, flexible touchscreens Researchers from RMIT University, University of New South Wales, and Monash University developed a thin, flexible electronic material for touchscreens. The material is 100 times thinner than current touchscreen materials. The new screens are still based on indium-tin oxide (ITO), a common touchscreen material. However, a liquid metal printing approach was used... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 15


Another record-breaking tandem perovskite solar cell University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists report a new design for perovskite solar cells that achieves an average steady-state efficiency of 18.4%, with a high of 21.7% and a peak efficiency of 26%. "This has a great potential to be the cheapest photovoltaic on the market, plugging into any... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: July 26


Flexible MRAM Researchers from the National University of Singapore, Yonsei University, Ghent University and Singapore's Institute of Materials Research and Engineering embedded a magnetic memory chip on a plastic material, flexible enough to be bent into a tube. The new device operates on magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM), which uses a magnesium oxide (MgO)-based magnetic tunn... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Feb. 2


Single electron transistors A group coordinated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) is setting out on a four year program to develop single electron transistors fully compatible with CMOS technology and capable of room temperature operation. The single electron transistor (SET) switches electricity by means of a single electron. The SET is based on a quantum dot (consisting... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Nov. 3


Lithium-air batteries gain ground Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a working laboratory demonstration of a lithium-oxygen battery which has very high energy density, is more than 90% efficient, and can be recharged more than 2000 times. Their demonstrator relies on a highly porous, 'fluffy' carbon electrode made from graphene (comprising one-atom-thick sheets of ca... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 21


Harvesting more electromagnetic energy Researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada showed for the first time that it's possible to collect essentially all of the electromagnetic energy that falls onto a surface. Their approach involves the use of metamaterials that can be tailored to produce media that neither reflects nor transmits any power, enabling full absorption of incident w... » read more