Why Traceability Matters


More heterogeneous and increasingly dense chip designs make it much harder to stay on track with initial specifications. Paul Graykowski, senior technical marketing manager at Arteris IP, talks about matching requirements to the design, the impact of ECOs and other last-minute changes, and best practices for managing revisions. » read more

Extreme Ancestry: Silicon Edition


The ability to trace the genealogy of all the components in an electronic device has been getting more complex for decades. For many industries — automotive, defense, medical and others — the need to locate the source of a problem in near real-time is paramount to gauging the extent of that problem. The extreme case is when the issue occurs with a product that already has been distributed a... » read more

Traceability, Unfamiliar But Critical


Many understand that traceability is a popular concept. Still, understanding traceability in detail is more challenging, especially in how it connects to familiar objectives in the semiconductor design space. A simple way to understand is this: When a customer (call them C) asks a semiconductor supplier (call them S) to build a device to meet a system objective, they provide S with specificatio... » read more

Reinventing Traceability


This paper written by Vincent Thibault of Arteris IP describes semiconductor industry-specific problems with establishing and automating traceability between the disparate systems design teams use for requirements, specification, EDA, software engineering, verification, documentation and support. It proposes and explains the Arteris Harmony Trace solution which: Increases system quality... » read more

IP-XACT Is Back, For All The Right Reasons


The intent behind IP-XACT has always been to provide a bridge between system-on-chip (SoC) assembly and larger considerations. This standard has additionally been used to adapt to multi-sourced and constantly evolving intellectual property (IP) that design and product teams build, often in different companies. Moreover, it was used to interface with product development beyond the specialized ne... » read more

Adding Value With Unit Level Traceability (ULT) In Automotive Packaging


Automotive product traceability has existed in one form or another for several decades. Traceability generally refers to tracking and tracing each component that comprises every subsystem in a car. Traditionally, this has been achieved with direct part marking on mechanical or electronic components, using 1D or 2D barcodes or radio-frequency identification (RFID). Since vehicle recalls are cost... » read more

Automated Traceability Of Requirements In The Design And Verification Process Of Safety-Critical Mixed-Signal Systems


System-level design and verification of safety-critical hardware requires a consistent methodology which complies with industrial safety-standards, for example ISO 26262 for automotive applications. For certification of safety-critical systems, the development process has to implement and enforce a strict traceability of requirements, linking the requirement specification, the design implementa... » read more

Adding Value With Unit Level Traceability (ULT) In Automotive Packaging


Automotive product traceability has existed in one form or another for several decades. Traceability generally refers to tracking and tracing each component that comprises every sub-system in a car. Traditionally, this has been achieved with direct part marking on mechanical or electronic components, using 1D or 2D barcodes or radio-frequency identification (RFID). Since vehicle recalls are cos... » read more

Blockchain Attempts To Secure The Supply Chain


Blockchain technology is starting to be deployed more widely In the battle against counterfeiting, often coupled with component IDs to allow device authentication. Securing the supply chain is a complex challenge, particularly as more IP from more vendors in more locations makes its way into chips, packages or even systems. Being able to attest to the history of the device to prove its prove... » read more

New And Innovative Supply Chain Threats Emerging


The electronics supply chain is seeing evidence of increased sophistication in the counterfeiting of complex ICs and simple passives, both of which can impact the functioning and safety of the systems that use them. New technologies are being developed to build trust by helping to identify counterfeit devices before assembly and during failure analysis. It's too early to tell how effective t... » read more

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