System Bits: July 16


Test tube AI neural network In a significant step towards demonstrating the capacity to program artificial intelligence into synthetic biomolecular circuits, Caltech researchers have developed an artificial neural network made out of DNA that can solve a classic machine learning problem: correctly identifying handwritten numbers. The work was done in the laboratory of Lulu Qian, assistant p... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 5


Water insulators North Carolina State University, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Texas A&M University have developed what could be considered as water insulators for energy storage applications. Basically, researchers sandwiched water between two materials, enabling higher power storage devices with more efficiency. More specifically, in the lab, researchers developed a compou... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 23


Looking inside memristors E-beam inspection is gaining steam. Using this type of technology, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been able to see the inner workings of the memristor. The memristor is a type of ReRAM, which works by changing the resistance of materials. In a memristor, an electric current is applied to a material, changing the resistance of that mat... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Jan. 2


World’s coldest chip Using a network of nuclear refrigerators, the University of Basel and others claim to have set the record for the world’s coldest chip. Researchers have cooled a chip to a temperature lower than 3 millikelvin. A millikelvin is one thousandth of a kelvin. Absolute zero is 0 kelvin or minus 273.15 °C. In the experiment, researchers used a chip that includes a Coulomb... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Jan. 10


Antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric RAM Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Swiss Nanoscience Institute, and the University of Basel developed a concept for a new, low power memory chip. In particular, the group focused on finding an alternative to MRAM using magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, which are activated by an electrical voltage rather than by a current. "... » read more

System Bits: March 10


Surviving entanglement breakdown Researchers at MIT have discovered that preserving the fragile quantum property known as entanglement isn’t necessary to reap benefits. By way of background, the MIT team reminded that the promise of quantum information processing, i.e., solving problems that classical computers can’t, as well as perfectly secure communication depends on a phenomenon cal... » read more