System Bits: July 18


Melanoma predicted from images with a high degree of accuracy by neural network model The poke and punch of traditional melanoma biopsies could be avoided in the near future, thanks to work by UC Santa Barbara researchers. UCSB undergrad Abhishek Bhattacharya is using the power of artificial intelligence to help people ascertain whether that new and strange mark is, in fact, the deadly skin... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: June 13


FeFET biz heats up The ferroelectric FET (FeFET) market is heating up. One company, Ferroelectric Memory Co. (FMC), has been developing FeFETs, a new memory type for use in standalone and embedded applications. Now, Imec is also developing FeFETs in both planar and vertical varieties. [caption id="attachment_147967" align="alignleft" width="239"] Imec's FeFET (Source: Imec)[/caption] ... » read more

System Bits: May 30


Diamonds for quantum computing Quantum computers are experimental devices that offer large speedups on some computational problems, and one promising approach to building them involves harnessing nanometer-scale atomic defects in diamond materials. At the same time, practical, diamond-based quantum computing devices will require the ability to position those defects at precise locations in com... » read more

System Bits: March 14


Neuromorphic computing While for five decades, Moore’s law held up pretty well, today, transistors and other electronic components are so small they’re beginning to bump up against fundamental physical limits on their size, and because Moore’s law has reached its end, it’s going to take something different to meet the need for computing that is ever faster, cheaper and more efficient. ... » read more

System Bits: March 7


Math picture language Harvard University researchers reminded that Galileo called mathematics the “language with which God wrote the universe,” as he described a picture-language. Now that language has a new dimension. [caption id="attachment_35501" align="alignright" width="300"] Arthur Jaffe (left) and Zhengwei Liu are the creators of a new, 3D pictorial language for mathematics. They b... » read more

The Week In Review: IoT


Security Last month’s distributed denial-of-service cyberattacks have put the spotlight on poorly secured or insecure Internet of Things devices. "The harsh reality is that cybersecurity is not even on the radar of many manufacturers," said Trent Telford, CEO of Covata, an Internet security firm. "Security will eventually become more of a priority, but it may well be too late for this genera... » read more

System Bits: Oct. 18


First quantum computer bridge Quantum computing is closer than we think. For the first time on a single chip, Sandia National Laboratories and Harvard University researchers have shown all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together by forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix. Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho pointed out that small qua... » read more

System Bits: Aug. 16


Record-breaking quantum logic gate Reaching the benchmark required theoretically to build a quantum computer, University of Oxford researchers have achieved a quantum logic gate with record-breaking 99.9% precision. They reminded that quantum computers, which function according to the laws of quantum physics, have the potential to dwarf the processing power of today's computers, able to pro... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 21


A chip with 1,000 processors A microchip containing 1,000 independent programmable processors has been designed by a team at the University of California, Davis. Called the KiloCore chip, it contains 621 million transistors and was fabricated by IBM using its 32nm CMOS technology. Cores operate at an average maximum clock frequency of 1.78 GHz, and they transfer data directly to each other r... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: June 7


Tiny lasers on silicon A group of scientists from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the University of California, Santa Barbara, Sandia National Laboratories, and Harvard University were able to fabricate tiny lasers directly on silicon. To do this, they first had to resolve silicon crystal lattice defects to a point where the cavities were essentially equivalent to those gr... » read more

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