Manufacturing Bits: April 12

Ink FETs The University of Pennsylvania has developed a new way to make chips by using nanocrystal inks. The devices, dubbed nanocrystal field-effect transistors (FETs), could be used one day to develop chips for flexible and wearable applications In the lab, researchers devised spherical nanoscale particles. These particles, which have electrical characteristics, were dispersed in a liquid... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: April 5

DNA diodes Researchers at the University of Georgia and at Ben-Gurion University in Israel created nanoscale electronic components from single DNA molecules. "For 50 years, we have been able to place more and more computing power onto smaller and smaller chips, but we are now pushing the physical limits of silicon," said Bingqian Xu, an associate professor in the UGA College of Engineerin... » read more

Using DNA Differently

As the Internet of Everything creeps closer and closer, technologies from wireless to biometrics are undergoing metamorphosis. On the biometrics front, there is a vast array of applications, from fingerprints to facial recognition—even finger vein recognition. But the one that is garnering a lot of attention these days is DNA sequencing, and a subset called rapid DNA sequencing. Both are b... » read more

10 Common Device Noise Analysis Mistakes

Device noise is critical in nanometer-scale CMOS processes, and it fundamentally limits the performance of many circuits at 45 nm and below. Given the right tools, device noise analysis (DNA) is a fairly straightforward process that should produce results that are within 1 dB to 2 dB of silicon measurements. However, there are a number of common mistakes that can lead to grossly overestimating ... » read more

5 Technologies To Watch

The industry is developing a dizzying array of new technologies. In fact, there are more new and innovative technologies than ever before. And the list is countless. At least from my vantage point, I have come up with my own list of the top five technologies to watch in 2015 and beyond. They are listed in alphabetical order. (See below). Obviously, there are more than just five technologi... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: July 7

Silicon photonics prototyping A group of European and other research organizations have put the finishing touches on a project to help propel the development of silicon photonics into the commercial market. The project, dubbed ESSenTIAL, enables small- to mid-sized enterprises to develop prototypes and products based on silicon photonics. Funded by the European Commission, the project inclu... » read more

DNA For Cryptography Chips

Counterfeit chips are here to stay. There are all kinds of reasons they should never be used, but certain segments of the chip market have more critical fallout from such chips than others. In most cases counterfeit chip use is unintentional. It simply goes undetected in the vast supply chain, sometimes with life-threatening repercussions. But whether in life-safety or low-end consumer produ... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 23

Higgs boson sensors At the recent 2014 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in San Francisco, CERN described the tiny hybrid pixel detectors used at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Using CMOS technology, hybrid pixel detectors identify and tag individual sub-atomic particles at fast speeds. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is a particle physics laboratory... » read more

What’s Next For DNA Chips?

The field of genomic personalized medicine is an emerging and promising area. Using lab systems called DNA sequencers, these units could provide vital information about an individual’s genetic makeup. In this area, several companies are developing next-generation DNA sequencers, built around CMOS-based semiconductor technology. But CMOS-based DNA sequencing chips, and the competing techno... » read more

Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 10

Using DNA to assemble transistors from graphene Graphene is a sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb pattern, just a single atom thick. It could be a better semiconductor than silicon – if we could fashion it into ribbons 20 to 50 atoms wide. Could DNA help? Stanford chemical engineering professor Zhenan Bao, believes it could. Bao and her team of researchers hope to solve a problem... » read more