System Bits: May 31


In automaton we trust? It is widely believed that there are two kinds of robots: friendly and helpful; or sinister and deadly. But do humans place too much trust in robots? According to the work of Harvard University senior Serena Booth, a computer science concentrator at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the answer is as complex and multifaceted as robots themsel... » read more

System Bits: April 28


Transistor encasing for better device performance ECE Illinois researchers have discovered a more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires. Led by Professor Joseph W. Lyding and graduate student Jae Won Do, the team reported this new transistor technology comprised of carbon nanotube wires shows promise in replacing silicon because it can operate 10 times as fast and is ... » read more

System Bits: Sept. 9


First transistor-based flexible device with graphene A flexible display incorporating graphene in its pixels’ electronics has been successfully demonstrated by the Cambridge Graphene Centre and Plastic Logic, the first time graphene has been used in a transistor-based flexible device. The prototype is meant to be a first step towards the wider implementation of graphene and graphene-like ... » read more

Synopsys-Coverity Deal Final


Synopsys’ acquisition of Coverity, which makes tools for testing and analyzing software, was made official yesterday. Now what? That may be the $334 million question, which is the price Synopsys paid for the 11-year-old software tools vendor. Even Synopsys’ top executives are rather candid in their uncertainty about where this deal will lead, and they made no qualms about that at the Syn... » read more

System Bits: March 25


A robot that is a toy at heart Two University of Cambridge alumnus have developed a small robot to help children learn programming and robotics while they play.   [caption id="attachment_11073" align="alignnone" width="300"] (Source: Robotiky.com)[/caption] Under the guise of Robotiky, and within two months of their initial idea, they secured seed funding for a prototype robot, w... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 7


Vanadium’s wonders Already prized for its extraordinary ability to change size, shape and physical identity, vanadium dioxide can now add muscle power to its attributes, researchers with Berkeley Lab reported. They have demonstrated a micro-sized robotic torsional muscle/motor made from vanadium dioxide that for its size is a thousand times more powerful than a human muscle, able to catapult... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Dec. 31


Bringing Graphene Down To Earth For years, the semiconductor industry has been looking at graphene as a next-generation technology for a multitude of applications. One potential application, the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET), has been developed by various companies and universities. There are several advantages and disadvantages with GFETs. On one hand, GFETs have a higher mobilit... » read more

Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 24


LEGO AFM Students from the University College London (UCL), Tsinghua University and Peking University have built an atomic force microscope (AFM) or nanoscope using toy LEGOs. The AFM, dubbed LEGO2NANO, costs less than $500 to make. In contrast, traditional AFMs cost $100,000 or more. The system was made using LEGOs, Arduino controllers, 3D printed parts and consumer electronics. [captio... » read more