Blog Review: Mar. 7

Synopsys' Amit Paunikar and Shaily Khare take a look at new features in LPDDR5, from improved data bandwidth and Deep Sleep Mode to WCK clock. Cadence's Paul McLellan dives into forward error correction, a technique for automatically correcting errors in transmitted network data, with a look at why it's important and how it works. In his latest embedded software video, Mentor's Colin Wall... » read more

Automotive IC Industry Trends

A trend that will continue in 2018 is the rise of the smart, autonomous car. As consumers and regulators demand more capability from automobiles, semiconductors have become the most critical part of these innovative solutions. But these chips, designed to bring safety and economy to the car’s operation, also bring complexity and higher requirements for reliability, requirements that have not ... » read more

Blog Review: Jan. 17

Mentor's Puneet Sinha identifies the key challenges, along with cost reduction and optimization opportunities, that come with using electric powertrains in autonomous vehicles. Synopsys' Robert Vamosi examines the impact of limited cellular networks on autonomous cars, and new communications protocols that could address coverage gaps. Cadence's Paul McLellan listens in as Lucian Shifren o... » read more

Electronic Design For Reliable Autonomous Driving

In the area of advanced driver assistance systems, most car makers and their suppliers have laid out exciting road maps all the way to highly automated and fully automated driving in 5 to 10 years. But are the electronics keeping up with these ambitious plans? At least for the automotive industry as a mass market, the current design processes for microchips and systems are not yet ready. An ... » read more

Self-Driving Cars And Kobayashi Maru

Kobayashi Maru. If you know what I am talking about, you are a bona fide Star Trek fan. If not, let me indulge. Kobayashi Maru is a computer simulation for a training exercise in the fictional Star Trek universe, where Starfleet Academy cadets are presented with a no-win scenario. But they do have to make a decision. The primary goal of the exercise is to rescue a disabled civilian vessel... » read more

Self-Driving Cars At CES: The Future Of Transportation Is Here

CES 2018 attendees will get a new kind of tech demo in just a few weeks. When they hail Lyft to take them from the Las Vegas Convention Center across town, it will be a fully automated point-to-point vehicle getting them there. While we marvel now, today’s novelty will be tomorrow’s norm, though questions about the safety of autonomous driving persist. For the CES demo, a backup pilot wi... » read more

System Bits: Jan. 2

Robots imagine their future to learn By playing with objects and then imagining how to get the task done, UC Berkeley researchers have developed a robotic learning technology that enables robots to figure out how to manipulate objects they have never encountered before. The team expects this technology could help self-driving cars anticipate future events on the road and produce more intel... » read more

How Good Is 95% Accuracy?

Conventional, deterministic computers don’t make mistakes. They execute a predictable series of computations in response to any given input. The input might be mistaken. The logic behind the operations that are performed might be flawed. But the computer will always do exactly what it has been told to do. When unexpected results occur, they can be attributed to the programmer, the system manu... » read more

Blog Review: Dec. 20

Mentor's Andrew Macleod points out five things that need to happen for autonomous and electric cars to move from R&D and test cases to mass-produced, commercially viable vehicles. Synopsys' Iain Singleton provides some tips on tackling large designs with formal and how the assume-guarantee technique helps split them without masking bugs. Cadence's Paul McLellan shares updates from the... » read more

At The Intersection Of Electronics And Automobiles

While we’re idling at this traffic light, let’s “blue sky” a bit. Over the course of a year, the average American driver spends the equivalent of more than seven 40-hour work weeks just sitting in a car. Crazy, right?  But who measures work weeks as only 40 hours anymore? Those 280+ hours spent driving means there’s a lot of non-productive overhead time, to borrow a term from semi... » read more

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