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hybrid cloud

Combines use of a public cloud service with a private cloud, such as a company's internal enterprise servers or data centers.
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Description

A hybrid cloud combines use of a public cloud service, such as AWS or Google Cloud, with a private cloud, such as a company’s internal enterprise servers or data centers. The reason companies use a combination is they want to augment their own data centers and still keep certain internal databases that may be more secure or more easily shared through from the company’s private data centers. Hybrid clouds still enables access to SaaS (software as a service) that via the public cloud.

Again, a public cloud are data centers with servers and storage that are owned and managed by a company that sells access to the cloud for storage and software use.

From an EDA/semiconductor-design perspective, “the majority of companies developing ICs have significant investments in computing capacity in the form of on-premises data centers,” explains ClioSoft‘s Ranjit Adhikary. “For efficiency reasons, companies try to maximize the utilization rates of their compute servers, which typically means substantial wait times for many jobs. These companies would prefer to use the cloud in a hybrid fashion to augment their existing on-premises infrastructure, not replace it. They need a solution that complements their existing flows and methodologies, not one that requires them to create new ones. They need a solution that scales to almost any number of CPUs on-demand and goes idle when not in use.”